Coleoidea

(redirected from Coleoid)

Coleoidea

[‚kō·lē′ȯid·ē·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)
A subclass of cephalopod mollusks including all cephalopods except Nautilus, according to certain systems of classification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relationship of some coleoid cephalopods established by 3' end of the 16S rDNA and cytochrome oxidase Ill gene sequence comparison.
5,34,35) Eumelanin is also the main component of the ink produced by coleoid cephalopods, that is squids (Teuthida), cuttlefish (Sepiida), and octopuses (Octopoda).
Molecular phylogeny of coleoid cephalopods (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) inferred from three mitochondrial and six nuclear loci: a comparison of alignment, implied alignment and analysis methods.
Washington, May 22 (ANI): Some marine animals known as coleoid cephalopods, which includes octopus, squid, and cuttlefish are wizards of camouflage.
Coleoid cephalopods, which include squids, cuttlefish, and octopods, are prevalent in global marine environments and serve as an important prey resource to a wide range of fishes, marine mammals, birds, and other invertebrates including conspecifics (Lipinski and Jackson, 1989; Hanlon and Messenger, 1996; Blanc and Daguzan, 2000; Staudinger and Juanes, 2010a).
Phylogenetic analyses of cytochrome c oxidase I sequences to determine higher-level relationship within the coleoid cephalopods.
For this study, the team studied camouflage in the marine animals known as coleoid cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish).
Phylogenetic analysis of cytochrome c oxidase I sequences to determine higher-level relationships within the coleoid cephalopods.
The COI gene for phylogenetic analysis of the coleoid cephalopods exhibited a high degree of nucleotide sequence variability, with one half of the sites varying in at least one taxon; COI amino acid sequences were highly conserved, but were useful in determining basal-level relationships among the Coleoidea (Carlini et al.
Acetylcholine (ACh), which is synthesized from choline (Ch), is believed to hold a central place in signaling mechanisms within the central nervous system (CNS) of cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) and other coleoid cephalopods.
Analysis of morphology to determine primary sister-taxon relationships within coleoid cephalopods.
He further hypothesized that "competition" (which in his definition consisted of all "negative" biotic interactions, including predation) with these fishes through visually based interactions led to the (convergent) evolution of modern coleoid cephalopods (Packard, 1972).