Coleridge


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Coleridge

Samuel Taylor. 1772--1834, English Romantic poet and critic, noted for poems such as The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), Kubla Khan (1816), and Christabel (1816), and for his critical work Biographia Literaria (1817)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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When he manages to sleep, Coleridge is terrorized by a black wolf in dream sequences that are evocative of early Stephen King.
During the Romantic Era, the Gothic and Orientalist spectacles often staged at the patent theaters (Drury Lane, Covent Garden, and summer Haymarket) served a similar function to the types of tales Coleridge describes.
While living at the property, Wordsworth penned one of his most famous poems - Tintern Abbey - while Coleridge wrote The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
Speaking at an anti-abortion rally in Brisbane Saturday, Coleridge cited China as a cause for fears that the new legislation would lead to abortions being undertaken for gender selection purposes.
Keywords: Coleridge; "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner;" Jung; Dreams; Analytical Psychology
An unlimited imagination such as this made possible, it would seem, the birth of Coleridge's dream of Xanadu, under the intoxicating fumes of opium that unbarred the access to that otherworldly language which Byron made reference to when speaking of the two realms of reality that he became aware of as truly existing: the common normal reality of wakeful states, and the unfathomable somnambulistic altered reality of oneiric states, in which the language of the ancient gods that a Keats had had access to in Hyperion is unbarred.
Glynn, a senior lecturer at Cardiff School of Art & Design, is a cofacilitator of the international Coleridge In Wales 2016 festival.
Glynn, a senior lecturer in Cardiff School of Art & Design, is a co-facilitator of the international Coleridge in Wales 2016 festival.
In 1794, Coleridge abandoned university and decided to walk across Wales.
This study documents how William Hart Coleridge, the first Anglican bishop of Barbados and the Leewards, executed the new mandate of the Anglican church between 1824 and 1842.
The first reference to Don Quixote by Coleridge appears in his essay "The Soul and its Organs of Sense," published in Robert Southey's Omniana in 1812.5 Carl Woodring notes that he had planned for a lecture on Don Quixote in 1812 (Coleridge, Table Talk 1: 322n).
Dean Coleridge is a man created for a specific job but who seeks another life.