Collaborationists


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Collaborationists

 

those who collaborated with the fascist invaders in the countries that the fascists occupied during World War II.

References in periodicals archive ?
It took eight years for the Institute for Research on Collaborationist Activities to finish the three-volume, 3,000-page compilation, which contains the list of 4,389 people, who the publisher says ''inflicted physical, material and mental damages, directly and indirectly, on Koreans and other people by positively cooperating with the Japanese imperialists' pillage of sovereignty, colonial rule and war of aggression.''
Corresponding to their larger treatments of the Revolution and French history, Vichy, the Resistance and various collaborationists assigned very different meanings to the day during the Occupation years.
The past few years have seen an avalanche of books on France under German occupation and the collaborationist regime headquartered at the resort town of Vichy from 1940 to 1944.
Albert Lebrun (June 16), he was titular head of the government that negotiated the surrender to Germany (June 22) and Italy (June 24); granted "emergency power" by the National Assembly at Vichy until a new constitution could be promulgated (July 10); he was thereafter closely identified with the Vichy government and with collaborationists, although age and possibly senility may have hampered his understanding of events, especially after the German occupation of Vichy (November 1942); arrested by the Germans (August 20) and taken first to Belfort and then Sigmaringen in Germany (September); returned to France (April 1945); was tried for treason by the provisional government of Gen.
The Huks, Lansdale was to find, "fought with amateur intensity, despised wealthy fellow countrymen who collaborated with their enemies, and assassinated many collaborationists." They soon became Lansdale's military responsibility, and, in conformance with his nature, Lansdale immediately decided that this problem was not even primarily military.
His call for purges, though understandably born from the loss of friends from the Resistance and nourished by his profound hostility towards the most diligent French collaborationists, was at odds with his long-standing opposition to the death penalty.
However, collaborationists in Paris took a very different view, considering the cartoon, like the cinema and comic strips, to be an ideological weapon, rather than just a form of entertainment exclusively reserved for children.
Vinen demonstrates that even though some French collaborationists were motivated by an admiration for Nazism or opportunism, the majority acted on the basis of other more complex and personal motives.
For these and other reasons, they were an irritation to both Germans and collaborationists, and they had to endure a certain amount of harrassment and a lot of bad press.
His government was hijacked in 1942 by collaborationists, led by Laval, the architect of "Kollaboration" with the occupier.
As for Antigone, Simone Fraisse remarks how the mythical |no' sayer denoted resistance to those so inclined under the Occupation to the extent that, against the intentions of the authors and directors, the public read a resistance message into the Antigones of Leon Chancerel (staged at the Vichy Chantlers de la jeunesse) and Anouilh.[36] Beatrix Dussane, Henri Amouroux, and Herve Le Boterf also corroborate from first hand observation the tendency of Resistance sympathizers in the audience to |adopt' Anouilh's Antigone, while collaborationists applauded along with them.[37]

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