collagenase

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Related to Collagenases: Interstitial collagenase

collagenase

[′kä·lə·jə‚nās]
(biochemistry)
Any proteinase that decomposes collagen and gelatin.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, recent studies by our group have demonstrated [IC.sub.50] levels of CMC 2.24 at even lower [micro]M levels (2-5 [micro]M) when tested in vitro against MMPs such as MMP-8 (leukocyte-type collagenase), MMP-9 (leukocyte-type gelatinase), MMP-12 (macrophage metalloelastase), and MMP-14 (membrane-type MMP) [13].
Collagenase ointment is a sterile enzymatic debriding ointment which contains 250 collagenase units per gram of white petrolatum USP.
In one of the two main studies, which enrolled 306 patients, 64% of those treated with collagenase clostridium had a contracture reduction of the primary joint to 0-5 degrees, 30 days after the last injection, compared with 7% among those in the placebo group.
Matrix metalloproteinase 13 (collagenase 3) in human rheumatoid synovium.
Follow-up tests showed that the tetracycline disarmed the collagenase made by certain immune system cells that contribute to inflammation, but other antibiotics had no effect.
Both alkaline phosphatase, which is required for bone calcification, and collagenase, which is required for bone resorption and remodeling, are zinc- requiring enzymes.
Activated AP-1 regulates type II collagen, proteoglycan, Cytokeratin 8 protein, MAP-1, MAP-2, and MAP-4 by activating collagenase and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby regulating cytoskeletal reorganization and remodeling [13].
Ionescu et al., "Enhanced cleavage of type II collagen by collagenases in osteoarthritic articular cartilage," Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol.
Herbal extracts are also potent inhibitors of pathologically elevated collagenases and hence may be used as an alternative adjunct in the management of periodontal disease.
Activity of type IV collagenases in benign and malignant breast disease.
Strauss III, director of the Center for Research on Women's Health and Reproduction at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and his colleagues focused on a family of enzymes called collagenases. Such enzymes degrade collagen, one of the structural components of the amniotic sac.
In addition to degrading numerous extracellular-matrix components, MMP3 can activate gelatinase B and the collagenases and release several cell surface molecules, including E-cadherin, a known contributor to cancer development (6).