collapsar

(redirected from Collapsars)
Also found in: Dictionary.

collapsar

[kə′lap‚sär]
(astronomy)
A black hole that forms during the gravitational collapse of a massive star.
References in periodicals archive ?
00] = 0 is the collapse condition, the surface of the collapsar is the mirror separating the spaces with both positive and negative flow of the observable time.
As follows from (12), in this case the surface of the sphere is simultaneously both the surface of the collapsar and the surface of the breaking of the space.
This comparison allows us to consider the process of transformation of the gravitational collapsar ("black hole") into the inflational collapsar ("white hole").
The surface r = a in this case is simultaneously: 1) the breaking surface; 2) the surface of the inflation collapsar.
The future penetrates into the inflation collapsar namely through this "mirror-like membrane"--the interior layer between the past and the future.
Stanyukovich assumed that the space of the Universe was a collapsar, whose Hilbert radius [r.
The point is that OS showed that there is a common system of coordinates applicable to both the exterior and interior of the collapsar.
For example, we have investigated [7] a collapsar whose equation of state is an idealized form of neutron [fluid.
According to the OS [4] model, the surface of the collapsar completely contracts to the barrier only at t = [infinity]; in the words of that article
Thus, for a collapsar made of real stellar matter, it makes sense to consider a state of equilibrium whose radius exceeds the gravitational, and for which light leaves the surface with a finite speed; this was the situation depicted in Figure 1.
The suggestion about the origin of the EHT image of Sagittarius A*, namely that part of the light we receive comes from the collapsar itself, has implications for the direction future observations with the telescope should take.
The collapsar model can fit this requirement; a superdense disk around the spinning black hole might form and re-form irregularly as matter from the explosion falls back inward.