Collapse


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to Collapse: lung collapse

collapse

[kə′laps]
(engineering)
Contraction of plastic container walls during cooling; produces permanent indentation.
(materials)
The flattening of cells in heartwood during drying or pressure treatment; often characterized by a caved-in or corrugated surface appearance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Collapse

 

acute vascular insufficiency accompanied by a fall in arterial and venous blood pressure.

Collapse is a result of a disturbance of the regulation of vascular tonus and injury to the vascular walls through infection, intoxication, massive blood loss, severe dehydration, myocardial affection (acute myocardial infarction), and other pathological conditions. Collapse is characterized by a decrease of blood flow to the heart, a deterioration of the blood supply to the vital organs, and the development of hypoxia. The patient’s facial features become pinched and the eyes roll back. He becomes pallid, with sticky perspiration and cold extremities. If the patient is conscious, he lies immobile and indifferent to his surroundings. Breathing is superficial and accelerated. The pulse is rapid. The most accurate index of the gravity of the patient’s condition is the degree to which arterial pressure is lowered. Severe collapse may be a direct cause of death. Collapse is treated with the immediate use of agents that stimulate the vascular and respiratory centers and with vasoconstrictors, blood transfusions, and blood substitutes. Measures should also be directed toward the elimination of the primary causes of the collapse.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

collapse

Mechanical failure of cells in wood, usually caused by abnormal or forced drying.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to calculate the scope of tunnel collapse, a plane rectangular coordinate system was established.
Building collapses are not rare in Nigeria, often because of poor construction practices.
"It simply doesn't look like a natural building collapse, and that's because all the columns have been removed at once to allow it to come down symmetrically in free-fall.
aACoeThe high rate of system collapses in recent time, which has given rise to more than 15 collapses in the last five months, calls for a critical look.
being [N.sub.1] x [N.sub.2] the number of final histories of collapse, where the histories are, now, being instantaneously counted at [tau], within the Universe entropic evolution.
"Any creaking or cracking noises, or bowing in the attic," Farrell said, could be a sign of impending collapse and people should first get out of the structure and then call for assistance.
Due to the proximity of the collapse to the blocks of flats, residents in all three properties have been evacuated by their landlord, RCT Homes.
Murrah Federal Building was destroyed by explosion of a truck bomb knocking out three columns at its base level which then triggered the progressive collapse of the whole building [3].
A Collapse May Be Something More than Just a Complete Caving in of a Structure
Interestingly, before this brilliant author gets to the Easter Islands, or the Anasazi of North America, or the Vikings of Greenland, he spends the first chapter on the economic collapse of the state of Montana, a place where he has lived part time for many years.
At about the same time at the end of 2004 that Buffett warned of the dollar's collapse, investment banker Peter G.
That air then presses on the lungs leading to a partial or complete collapse.A