CMOS

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CMOS

CMOS

(Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) Pronounced "c-moss." The most widely used integrated circuit design. CMOS transistors are found in almost every electronic product from handheld devices to mainframes. CMOS uses PMOS and NMOS transistors wired together in a balanced fashion that causes less power to be used (for more details, see MOSFET). The first transistors were bipolar, which are still used when higher power is required. CMOS and bipolar are also used in combination. See FET, bipolar transistor and CMOS memory.


A Note From the Author
In the early 1980s, my wife Irma and I had a kitten at the beach named CMOS. When we introduced her to people, everyone thought "Sea Moss" was such a cute name for a beach cat. However, when we told them CMOS stood for "complementary metal oxide semiconductor," they didn't come around much any more! CMOS didn't last long, as I became quite allergic to her a few months later.
References in periodicals archive ?
He also spent several years as a research analyst developing Collateralized Mortgage Obligations trading portfolio management models for International Asset Management Companies.
Tom Pope's April 1 article, Mortgaged-Backed Investments Threaten Nonprofits, attempts to describe the risks nonprofit managers face when investing in collateralized mortgage obligations and collateralized debt obligations, especially in the wake of the current credit crisis.
New analysis by the Analysis Group/Economics suggests that options can be valued much like mortgages were in the 1980s with the advent of collateralized mortgage obligations, or CMOs.
In particular, the innovations of collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs) and real estate mortgage investment conduits (REMICs) have resulted in securities that provide different claims and priorities on the principal and interest payments made on underlying loans, thus accommodating the various needs and preferences of investors.
You can't close a deal that involves a parcel of collateralized mortgage obligations, for example, unless the underlying property is free from environmental liability," Murphy said.
Some define derivatives to include asset-backed securities (such as collateralized mortgage obligations, interestand principal-only securities, residual securities and stractured notes), which generally are recognized in a user's statement of financial position.