Collective Nouns


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Collective Nouns

 

nouns that refer to a group of persons, objects, or phenomena as an indivisible whole. Examples are rodnia (“kinsfolk”), molodezh’ (“young people”), studenchestvo (“students”), dich’ (“game animals”), and bel’e (“laundry”). Collective nouns may not be used in the plural or in combination with cardinal numbers, in contrast to nouns referring to a group of similar objects or persons, for example, “group” or “herd.”

References in periodicals archive ?
Dutch resembles English in that determiners and quantifiers preceding Dutch collective nouns are always singular (e.g., dat / **die / een / **tien comite ('that / **those / a / *ten committee').
Even though measurement models may not require the use of a collective noun, some preservice teachers who choose measurement models also have difficulty describing fractions greater than one.
1989 "On the semantics of collective nouns in English", in: Odenstedt, Bengt -- Gunnar Persson (eds.), 179-188.
EXERCISE 22.8 Collective Nouns, Titles, and Amounts Read each sentence below, and identify the subject and the verb.
Collective nouns (also called group nouns) describe a set or group of people, animals or things, for example a flock (of sheep), a team (of players).
His fascination began when he copied out a list of collective nouns for animals at primary school.
You may not have noticed but the hunt for a collective noun for frogs has led us to philosophise about the relationships between the generations.
So to discover if you can avoid patronising laughs by knowing your gaggles from your tribes, match up these collective nouns with the creatures they describe
I am sure that out there anybody reading this will think of some modern collective nouns that will fit today's modern Twitter, Facebook, social media obsessed society.
Barney, who has done a lot more travelling, told me that it was not at school where he really encountered animal collective nouns, but when he visited South Africa and went out, two days in a row, on safari.
Collective nouns in English have been the object of numerous investigations aimed at exploring their patterns of agreement (Levin 2001, 2006; Depraetere 2003; Hundt 2006, 2009).
While the words introduce collective nouns, the pictures show a small child searching for a place to belong.

Full browser ?