colonnade

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colonnade

(kŏlənād`), a row of columns usually supporting a roof. Colonnades were popular with the Greeks and Romans, who employed them in the stoastoa
, in ancient Greek architecture, an extended, roofed colonnade on a street or square. Early examples consisted of a simple open-fronted shed or porch with a roof sloping from the back wall to the row of columns along the front.
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 and the porticoportico
, roofed space using columns or posts, generally included between a wall and a row of columns or between two rows of columns. In Greece the stoa was a portico of the first type; in Greek temples porticoes terminated the front and rear ends of the naos—called
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; they have continued to be used throughout the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and modern times. See columncolumn,
vertical architectural support, circular or polygonal in plan. A column is generally at least four or five times as high as its diameter or width; stubbier freestanding masses of masonry are usually called piers or pillars, particularly those with a rectangular plan.
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.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Colonnade

A combination or grouping of columns paced at regular intervals, and arranged with regard to their structural or ornamental relationship to the building. They can be aligned either straight or arced in a circular pattern.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Colonnade

 

a row or rows of columns supporting a horizontal roof structure. Outdoor colonnades, which are either porticoes or galleries, are usually attached to a building to unify its isolated elements (for example, the Palladian villas). A colonnade also visually relates a building to its courtyard or square (for example, the colonnade of the Kazan Cathedral, Leningrad, 1801–11, architect A. N. Voronikhin) and its natural setting. Some colonnades are independent structures, such as the Colonnade of Apollo in Pavlovsk (1780–83, architect C. Cameron). Interior colonnades usually surround large halls, serving both to divide and unite various parts of a grand interior (for example, the colonnade in the former Catherine Hall in the Tauride Palace, Leningrad, 1783–89, architect I. E. Starov).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

colonnade

[‚käl·ə′nād]
(architecture)
A series of columns placed at regular intervals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

colonnade

colonnade
A number of columns arranged in order, at intervals called intercolumniation, supporting an entablature and usually one side of a roof.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

colonnade

1. a set of evenly-spaced columns
2. a row of regularly spaced trees
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The collonade is made of palest green bowenite, enclosing a pale pink enamel Egg with a silver-gilt cupid representing the Tsarevitch surmounting it, while four silver-gilt cherubs representing his four sisters surround the base.
The church is set round a dog-leg collonade and cloister, overlooked by a wayward rose window and outdoor pulpit.
? La Crepe Rit is situated on The Collonades of Albert Dock near Tate Liverpool, and is open daily from 10am-5pm.
From the likes of The Collonades to Wapping Dock, there are some really beautiful apartments to choose from with great views across the Mersey and beyond.
The wide Baroque arches and graceful collonades provide the perfect backdrop for the ornate home of the world-famous Holy Shroud of Turin.