Colobinae

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Colobinae

 

a subfamily of lower catarrhine monkeys of the family Cercopithecidae. The body measures 41–83 cm in length, and the tail 50–110 cm (in Simias, 13–15 cm). The head is rounded, and the lower jaw is short. Cheek pouches are absent. There are six genera: Colobus, Presbytis, Pygathrix, Nasalis, Rhinopithecus, and Simias; the last three genera are collectively called proboscis monkeys.

The Colobinae are distributed in Southeast Asia, except for Colobus, which is found in Africa. The monkeys are arboreal; Rhinopithecus and Presbytis live in mountains to elevations of 3,600 m. All genera feed on leaves, fruits, and young shoots.

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[USA], Sep 1 (ANI): Asian Colobine monkeys are unable to taste natural sugars, and in fact have a generally poor sense of taste as the receptors on their tongues do not function in the same way as for fruit-eating monkeys, found biologists.
The estimated age and geographic location of the species suggest that the Simuilus minutus was likely in competition with colobine monkeys for food resources.
Effect of dietary fibre on the faeces score in colobine monkeys at Dutch Zoos.
6), even though not described in detail, was attributed to this colobine species by Delson (1973, 1974; also Szalay and Delson, 1979; Perez and Soria, 1990; Moya Sola et al, 1990).
The evolution of allomothering behavior among Colobine monkeys: function and opportunism in evolution.
Instead of eating fruits and insects as most monkey species do, colobine monkeys in Asia and Africa have a diet more like cows'.
McKenna, "The evolution of allomothering among colobine monkeys: function and opportunism in evolution," American Anthropologist 81 (1979), pp.
How did "monophagic folivores," such as the "colobine monkey, three-toed sloth, panda, and koala," eat?
Nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA: evidence for hybridization in colobine monkeys.
A comparison of the floristics and leaf chemistry of the tree flora in two Malaysian rain forests and the influence of leaf chemistry on populations of colobine monkeys in the Old World.
pallidum infection is possible in some of the investigated species (colobines), it is likely that infection is not yet present because of behavioral and ecologic constraints between the infected and noninfected species.
Aside from the discovery of numts in humans and many other species, Karanth (2008) have definitively illustrated the presence numts in primates, specifically colobines.