Colocynth


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Related to Colocynth: Colocynthis

Colocynth

 

(Citrullus colocynthis), a perennial prostrate or climbing herbaceous plant of the family Cucurbitaceae. It is also known as bitter apple. The leaves are deeply pinnatipartite, with five to seven pinnately lobed segments. The plants are monoecious. The flowers are unisexual, yellow, and five-lobed. The fruits are yellow and spherical, measuring 7–12 cm in diameter; they have a dry bitter flesh. Colocynth grows in North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Southwest Asia as far as India. In the USSR it grows in Turkmenia as an imported annual weed; it is sometimes cultivated in botanical gardens in Middle Asia and Transcaucasia. The fruits contain the glycoside colocynthin, which is a strong laxative.

References in periodicals archive ?
walnut, fenugreek and Colocynth) to determine their effects and possible complications.
Thanks to the miracle of electronics and silicon, one finds that "Citrullus colocynthis, commonly known as the colocynth, bitter apple, bitter cucumber, egusi, or vine of Sodom (I beg your pardon!) is a viny plant native to the Mediterranean Basin and Asia, especially Turkey (especially in regions such as Izmir), Nubia, and Trieste.
Interpretation can only be managed by the cognoscenti in the audience who know that colocynth and aloe are botanical purgatives, while calomel is a chloride of mercury, all the "uncompounded" ingredients of emetic and laxative pills.
He prescribed it together with aloes, scammony, and extract of colocynth.' The pills cost five shillings per box.
A compound containing calomel combined with colocynth, a purgative extracted from the bitter cucumber, was also prescribed frequently.
Antifungal activity of nettle (Urticadiocia L.), colocynth (Citrulluscolocynthis L.
ciliaris); the colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis); and the devil's thorn (Tribulus terrestris, Zygophyllaceae).
Bitter apple plants Citrullus colocynthis, also known as bitter cucumber and colocynth or desert gourd, belong to the family of Cucurbitaceae and have a wide distribution, being commonly found in the sandy lands of India, Arabia, West Asia, and Tropical Africa and in the Mediterranean region (Pravin et al., 2013).
There are, however, no fruits comparable to the watermelons of the Kalahari or the colocynths (bitter cucumbers) of the Sahara, which are both nutritious and full of water.
Thereupon two men from Yemen approached and suggested that the juice of colocynths, rubbed into the man's foot-soles, might not make the affliction go away but it might in any case halt the aggravation of the disease.