colonnade

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colonnade

(kŏlənād`), a row of columns usually supporting a roof. Colonnades were popular with the Greeks and Romans, who employed them in the stoastoa
, in ancient Greek architecture, an extended, roofed colonnade on a street or square. Early examples consisted of a simple open-fronted shed or porch with a roof sloping from the back wall to the row of columns along the front.
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 and the porticoportico
, roofed space using columns or posts, generally included between a wall and a row of columns or between two rows of columns. In Greece the stoa was a portico of the first type; in Greek temples porticoes terminated the front and rear ends of the naos—called
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; they have continued to be used throughout the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and modern times. See columncolumn,
vertical architectural support, circular or polygonal in plan. A column is generally at least four or five times as high as its diameter or width; stubbier freestanding masses of masonry are usually called piers or pillars, particularly those with a rectangular plan.
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.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Colonnade

A combination or grouping of columns paced at regular intervals, and arranged with regard to their structural or ornamental relationship to the building. They can be aligned either straight or arced in a circular pattern.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Colonnade

 

a row or rows of columns supporting a horizontal roof structure. Outdoor colonnades, which are either porticoes or galleries, are usually attached to a building to unify its isolated elements (for example, the Palladian villas). A colonnade also visually relates a building to its courtyard or square (for example, the colonnade of the Kazan Cathedral, Leningrad, 1801–11, architect A. N. Voronikhin) and its natural setting. Some colonnades are independent structures, such as the Colonnade of Apollo in Pavlovsk (1780–83, architect C. Cameron). Interior colonnades usually surround large halls, serving both to divide and unite various parts of a grand interior (for example, the colonnade in the former Catherine Hall in the Tauride Palace, Leningrad, 1783–89, architect I. E. Starov).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

colonnade

[‚käl·ə′nād]
(architecture)
A series of columns placed at regular intervals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

colonnade

colonnade
A number of columns arranged in order, at intervals called intercolumniation, supporting an entablature and usually one side of a roof.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

colonnade

1. a set of evenly-spaced columns
2. a row of regularly spaced trees
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In September, the group conducted a geo-mapping survey of the ruins of the town's Roman colonnades. The columns are made from granite from quarries in Troas in Turkey and reflect commercial activities involving building materials during the Roman period.
Mark Bryan, managing director of Optimum Group, said: "With museums, galleries and a huge range of venues to eat and drink in, amid the lofty colonnades of this architectural splendour, Albert Dock is the vibrant heart of Liverpool''s historic waterfront, and a great place to invest and create jobs.
Michael Swerdlow, who lives in the Colonnades, said approving a chip shop in the heart of the Albert Dock sent out the wrong message to visitors from the world over.
To create this glow and contrast, layers of light--in the colonnade bays, corridors, main entrance and above a grand staircase--radiate out to the courtyard grounds.
They form an original and integral part of the design and should be illuminated along with the portico, entrance and colonnades in order to maintain the integrity of the facade as a whole."
The same German company has done similar work on the colonnades of the Vatican, the Christ statue in Rio de Janeiro and the Statue of Liberty.
Mourners huddle in sleeping bags under the colonnades of St.
They look like an elegant row of columns, tiny enough for atomic-scale hide-and-seek, but these colonnades represent a new way to bring nanotechnology into mass production.
"That summer, in the first year of the reign of Titus, there appeared a small band of players who met with some success until they disappeared without trace, leaving behind one of their number." Such are the words of Pliny the Younger that Eleanor Antin reproduced on the wall at the entrance to her latest show, "Roman Allegories." In twelve large, exquisitely staged, and sumptuously shot tableaux, a motley cast of performers--characters include Columbine, the Lover, the Trickster, an ex-gladiator Strong Man, the Poet, and a little girl--moves through dilapidated tennis courts and nouveau-riche colonnades, poolside bacchanals and sylvan executions on a pilgrimage to the sea.
At 27,000 feet, our flight of four jets was surrounded with great colonnades of sunlit cloud--the sky's warm and humid spaces were filled with these vigorous thunderheads whose height and size could only hint at the huge mass of the storm to come.
Specifically constructed for all types of decorative and load-bearing installations, the columns are a low-cost way to add a touch of elegance to entrances, covered walkways, lobbies, colonnades and balconies, as well as providing more architectural detail to interior applications.
Blood's verse includes the long poems The Bride of the Iconoclast (1854) and The Colonnades (1868).