columbine

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Related to Columbines: aquilegia

Columbine:

see commedia dell'artecommedia dell'arte
, popular form of comedy employing improvised dialogue and masked characters that flourished in Italy from the 16th to the 18th cent. Characters of the Commedia Dell'Arte
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.

columbine

(kŏl`əmbīn), any plant of the genus Aquilegia, temperate-zone perennials of the family Ranunculaceae (buttercupbuttercup
or crowfoot,
common name for the Ranunculaceae, a family of chiefly annual or perennial herbs of cool regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Thought to be one of the most primitive families of dicotyledenous plants, the Ranunculaceae typically have a simple
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 family), popular both as wildflowers and as garden flowers. Columbines have delicate and attractive foliage and flower petals with long spurs that secrete nectar. The common Eastern red-and-yellow-flowered wild columbine (A. canadensis), frequenting rocky places, is also called rockbell; it is a favorite of hummingbirds, and Native Americans made an infusion of the seeds for headache and fever. The blue-and-white-flowered A. coerulea of the Rockies is the state flower of Colorado. The common European columbine (A. vulgaris), blue, white, or purple flowered, has been the source of many cultivars—some double and of various soft colors. Columbine is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Ranunculales, family Ranunculaceae.
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Columbine

light-hearted, flirtatious girl. [Ital. Lit.: Walsh Classical, 83]

columbine

traditional symbol of folly. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 173]
See: Folly
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

columbine

any plant of the ranunculaceous genus Aquilegia, having purple, blue, yellow, or red flowers with five spurred petals
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In an article published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, two researchers document their studies of the evolution of columbine flowers in North America.
And yes, I can see myself and my wife one day sending them to Columbine." A message of hope from this Colorado town whose name became a synonym for school gun carnage.
"Let Columbine be a benchmark for change, not despair.
In western Canada, growing columbines is both easy and frustrating.
The leaves of the columbine are generally green but some show a bluish tinge or a grayish hue.
On April 20, 1999, at 11:19 a.m., exploding bombs signaled the start of a violent rampage on the Columbine High School campus that left in its wake: 12 students, one teacher and two killers dead; 24 students transported to hospitals, and 160 more treated for injuries on site.
Columbine comes from columba, Latin for dove, because the flowers resemble the head and neck of a dove.
Short-lived perennials (most last only two to four years), columbines grow in almost every Western climate except Hawaii.
The color, shape, and length of the spur makes the nectar deep inside accessible to certain animals, enabling columbines to specialize and consequently diversify based on what pollinates them.
Since columbines like damp soil, she waters them for 30 minutes a day during the growing season.
* This spring, a columbine called 'Remembrance' is being introduced to honor the victims of the shooting tragedy at Columbine High School in Jefferson County, Colorado.
And now, riding high on the wave of perennial-plant popularity, more kinds of columbines are more widely available than ever.