Trajan's Column

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Trajan’s Column

 

a monument in Rome erected by the Emperor Trajan between 111 and 114. The column was designed by the Greek architect Apollodorus of Damascus. The marble structure is 38 m high and comprises a cubic pedestal, a base, and a shaft with a capital of the Roman Doric order. It was originally crowned by a bronze eagle, which was later replaced by a statue of Trajan; since 1587 a statue of St. Peter has stood at the top of the column. Trajan’s Column is famous for its reliefs, which wind around the shaft in a spiral. The reliefs have an overall length of 200 m and are 1 m wide. Masterfully executed and containing more than 2,500 figures, they depict Trajan’s Dacian campaigns and provide a valuable source of information on the life and military technology of the Romans and Dacians.

REFERENCES

Kruglikova, I. T. Dakiia v epokhu rimskoi okkupatsii. Moscow, 1955.
Blavatskii, V. D. Arkhitektura drevnego Rima. Moscow, 1938.
Cichorius, C. Die Reliefs der Traianssäule, vols. 1–2. Berlin, 1896–1900.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The inspiration for the frieze certainly came from that of the Column of Trajan, which illustrates the Dacian campaigns of the Roman emperor.
Cristina Calhoon, classics, discusses "Imperial Rome's Heart of Darkness: The Conquest of Dacia on the Column of Trajan." Room 159, Prince Lucien Campbell Hall.
The Eastern Gateway is built entirely of timber and based on depictions from the column of Trajan, a monument consisting of a 100-foot tall marble column set atop a massive rectangular base, topped by a gilded statue of the emperor Trajan himself.
Three centuries later, some of the legionnaires depicted on the Column of Trajan, erected in 113 AD, can be seen to be wearing material around their necks.