Trajan's Column

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Trajan’s Column

 

a monument in Rome erected by the Emperor Trajan between 111 and 114. The column was designed by the Greek architect Apollodorus of Damascus. The marble structure is 38 m high and comprises a cubic pedestal, a base, and a shaft with a capital of the Roman Doric order. It was originally crowned by a bronze eagle, which was later replaced by a statue of Trajan; since 1587 a statue of St. Peter has stood at the top of the column. Trajan’s Column is famous for its reliefs, which wind around the shaft in a spiral. The reliefs have an overall length of 200 m and are 1 m wide. Masterfully executed and containing more than 2,500 figures, they depict Trajan’s Dacian campaigns and provide a valuable source of information on the life and military technology of the Romans and Dacians.

REFERENCES

Kruglikova, I. T. Dakiia v epokhu rimskoi okkupatsii. Moscow, 1955.
Blavatskii, V. D. Arkhitektura drevnego Rima. Moscow, 1938.
Cichorius, C. Die Reliefs der Traianssäule, vols. 1–2. Berlin, 1896–1900.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.