Combe Capelle

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Combe Capelle

 

a grotto in the department of Dordogne, France, where a skeleton of ancient man was found in 1909 together with Upper Paleolithic stone tools and animal bones. The Combe Capelle man has been tentatively assigned to Middle Wurmian times and his age has been estimated at 30,000–35,000 years. He is characterized by short stature (160 cm), a greatly elongated skull, and a broad, only slightly protruding nose (some scientists see this as a sign of negroidness). The German anthropologist H. Klaatsch, who first described the Combe Capelle man, classified him, without apparent reason, as a separate species of Aurignacian man. The Combe Capelle man is one of the variants of the Upper Paleolithic population of western Europe.

REFERENCE

Proiskhozhdenie cheloveka i drevnee rasselenie chelovechestva. Moscow, 1951. (Tr. In-ta etnografii AN SSSR, vol. 16.)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
He did, however, believe that he had isolated a physical type that was extremely ancient, especially given the degree to which it resembled the Combe Capelle skull, found in France in 1909 and the 1881 Galley Hill (Kent) skull, then thought to be around 200,000 years old.
Both Galley Hill and Combe Capelle skulls are, for example, now known to be much younger than was thought in the 1930s.
McPherron (eds), A Multimedia Companion to the Middle Paleolithic Site of Combe Capelle Bas (France), CD-ROM, University of Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia.