combinatorial chemistry

(redirected from Combinational chemistry)
Also found in: Medical.

combinatorial chemistry

[kəm‚bīn·ə¦tȯr·ē·əl ′kem·ə·strē]
(organic chemistry)
A method for reacting a small number of chemicals to produce simultaneously a very large number of compounds, called libraries, which are screened to identify useful products such as drug candidates.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
of Rochester) and 17 co-authors provide a foundational overview of Dynamic Combinational Chemistry (DCC) and its extensive applications.
Open Access and Discovery are especially beneficial to high-throughput, combinational chemistry and drug discovery scientists by providing the non-expert user access to high performance LC-MS analysis.
Some scientists fear that many pharmaceutical and agricultural companies will abandon bioprospecting in favor of cheaper and less controversial approaches such as combinational chemistry, which can produce millions of modestly priced compounds.