Combray


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Combray

village of narrator and family. [Fr. Lit.: Remembrance of Things Past]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although most of the essays here at least pay lip service to the idea of going beyond "Combray" or even Du Cote de chez Swann in the context of a given course, it is clear that the main idea is to introduce a bit of Proust to undergraduates, with the hope that they might be incited to go farther some day.
Shattuck concludes, however, in a more positive vein with a close analysis of a passage from Combray. This parting shot is a stimulating reminder of the cardinal importance of the act of reading for Proust's and his Narrator's perception of the world.
Et l'on va voir que, pardessus meme Jean Santeuil alors en cours de redaction (entrepris en 1895 ce roman sera peu pres abadonne, l'etat d'ebauche, en 1899), se prepare deja par morceaux le paysage de Combray, au seuil de la Recherche.
Proust's own comment, in his interview in 1913 on the eve of the publication of Combray, might have been a good corrective.
Genet himself admits that, like Combray for Marcel, Mettray is buried deep within the catafalques of his imagination, to be resurrected along with the spatio-temporal, aesthetic dimensions of the friends he once had there: "J'aime Mettray, ce paradis au coeur de la Touraine royale ...
Cahier 74, for instance, contains a curious variant of a well-known scene from 'Combray' that dramatizes the grandfather's latent anti-Semitism (1, 90-91).
My starting-point for this broader treatment of metamorphosis involves the very early scene in Combray when Swann visits young Marcel's family.