blackhead

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blackhead,

yellowish or blackish plug of material accumulated in the duct of a sebaceous gland. The material consists of keratin (horny cells of the epidermis) and modified sebum (oily secretions of the sebaceous gland). Blackheads are the primary lesions in acneacne,
common inflammatory disease of the hair follicles and sebaceous glands characterized by blackheads, whiteheads, pustules, nodules and, in the more severe forms, by cysts and scarring. The lesions appear on the face, neck, back, chest, and arms.
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. Treatment is the same as for acne, with frequent cleansing of the skin followed by the application of astringent solutions. Plugs should be extracted only by a physician, since damage to the surrounding tissues occasioned by squeezing often leads to scarring.
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blackhead

[′blak‚hed]
(medicine)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

blackhead

1. a black-tipped plug of fatty matter clogging a pore of the skin, esp the duct of a sebaceous gland
2. an infectious and often fatal disease of turkeys and some other fowl caused by the parasitic protozoa Histomonas meleagridis
3. any of various birds, esp gulls or ducks, with black plumage on the head
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Saurat, "Strategic targets in acne: the comedone switch in question," Dermatology, vol.
It primarily affects the face, upper back, and chest, producing two types of lesions, inflammatory lesions and comedones. Physical sequelae of the condition such as scar formation and hyperpigmentation are common, but rarer sequelae such as cutaneous calcifications are infrequently reported in the literature [1, 2].
(2) The resulting lesions include noninflammatory open (blackheads) and closed (whiteheads) comedones, as well as inflammatory papules, pustules, and nodules.
Tretinoin, a type of drug called a retinoid that contains vitamin A, is the most effective topical medication for stopping the development of new comedones. It also fights acne by increasing cell turnover, which helps unplug existing comedones, and thereby allows other topical medications, such as antibiotics, to penetrate the follicles better.
It is characterized by seborrhoea, the formation of open and closed comedones, erythematous papules and pustules and in more severe cases nodules, deep pustules and pseudocysts.
The lesions recorded were multifocal alopecia, erythema, folliculitis, comedone, nodulocystic lesions papule, pustule (Fig.
Retinoids, a Vitamin A acid, increase turnover and decrease the cohesiveness of the follicular epithelial cells, leading to decreased comedone formation and extrusion of existing comedones (Taffe, 1997).
"Even patients with very pale skin can show, at the periphery of the comedone, a little darkness signaling inflammation.
Isotretinoin gel produced significantly greater reductions in total lesion counts and comedone counts than topical adapalene.
Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of pilosebaceous follicles characterized by comedone, papules, pustules, nodules and often scars.11 Acne was graded as mild: comedone, papules/pustules; moderate: papules, pustules/nodules; and severe: nodulocystic/acne conglobata (severe acne with many abscesses, cysts, marked scarring with sinus).10