Comet Arend-Roland


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Comet Arend-Roland

 

(Comet 1957 III), one of the most interesting comets of the 20th century; discovered Nov. 8, 1956, by S. Arend and G. Roland of Belgium. In April 1957, near the perihelion, Comet Arend-Roland attained the brightness of a star of the first stellar magnitude; the diameter of its head reached 300,000 km, the main tail was 45 million km long, and the bright secondary tail was 50–60 million km long. Numerous astrophysical observations of Comet Arend-Roland indicated a probable dust-particle structure of the secondary tail and a main tail structure of mixed dust and gaseous matter. The latter displayed interesting ray structures and cloud formations which accelerated rapidly. The comet could be observed by telescope until April 1958.

References in periodicals archive ?
As its angle of view changed the comet developed an anomalous anti-tail, which Mr James compared with Comet Arend-Roland in 1957, showing images by Reggie Waterfield from the BAA archives.
Later, I figured out, as the only bright comet from that time, we had observed Comet Arend-Roland after it rounded the Sun.
"We showed the comet Arend-Roland on our very first programme
My memory of some of his earliest photographs which he showed me from his archives during visits by myself and my wife Anne to Stakenbridge, were of two comets in 1957, and in particular that of Comet Arend-Roland with its marvellous anti-tail.
Interest was especially keen because 1957d soon became visible in about the same part of the evening sky as Comet Arend-Roland, which was the first naked-eye comet of the year and had been prominent only a few months earlier."
"She must have assumed," Fried says, "that since my head was always above the clouds, I would always know what was in the sky, but I didn't." So Fried went to the library and found out the object was Comet Arend-Roland. "I think this is what triggered my latent interest in the night sky, because I started reading more about comets, then dove into the popular astronomy books by Patrick Moore."
The first astronomical event he remembers was Comet Arend-Roland, one of the two great visitors of 1957.
In April 1957, a 1st-magnitude visitor called Comet Arend-Roland was making its way into the inner solar system.