Comet Hyakutake


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Comet Hyakutake

[¦käm·ət ‚hyä·ku̇′tä·ke]
(astronomy)
A comet that passed within about 0.1 astronomical unit of earth in late March 1996.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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If so, then all four such comets for the Northern Hemisphere in the past 50 years were best seen in March and April: Comet Bennett in 1970, Comet West in 1976, Comet Hyakutake in 1996, and Comet Hale-Bopp in 1997.
1996 Comet Hyakutake is discovered by Japanese amateur astronomer Yuji Hyakutake.
At the same time, spurred by the sight of the comet Hyakutake one night, Jan Deblieu began a quiet fascination with the night sky.
Yuji Hyakutake, an amateur Japanese astronomer who discovered ''Comet Hyakutake'' in 1996, died Wednesday evening in Kagoshima Prefecture, southwestern Japan, due to internal bleeding caused by a heart aneurysm, his family said Thursday.
The tail of Comet Hyakutake stretches 354 million miles, more than four times the distance between the earth and the sun.
They found that the tail of Comet Hyakutake stretched an incredible 570 million kilometres, nearly four times the distance between the Earth and the Sun.
Finally, following the discovery of X-rays from Comet Hyakutake in 1996, researchers used the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite to study X-rays from Hale-Bopp.
Another cool comet is coming our way, just 11 months after Comet Hyakutake, the brightest comet to light up our skies in years, wowed observes last spring.
When closest, this comet comes no nearer than about 122 million miles from Earth--about 13 times farther than last year's impressive Comet Hyakutake. But as I write these words experts still think that Hale-Bopp is so large and active that it may shine as bright or brighter than Hyakutake and, unlike Hyakutake, maintain that brightness level for weeks, not only days.
So does Comet Hyakutake. Little more than a smear when seen from the city, the comet, hanging above the V-shaped opening of the ravine, shines crisply and trails a tail across a huge stretch of sky.
Comet Hyakutake's long, delicate, gossamer tail provided a stark contrast to Hale-Bopp's brilliant coma and broad double tail, which were visible even under heavily light-polluted skies.
Using the velocity of the solar wind, the team calculated that 8 days earlier, Comet Hyakutake had been more than half a billion kilometers distant, yet in the right place--along the line connecting the sun and the spacecraft--to have generated the ions.