comment

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comment

[′käm‚ent]
(computer science)
An expression identifying or explaining one or more steps in a routine, which has no effect on execution of the routine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

comment

(programming)
(Or "remark") Explanatory text embedded in program source (or less often data) intended to help human readers understand it.

Code completely without comments is often hard to read, but code with too many comments is also bad, especially if the comments are not kept up-to-date with changes to the code. Too much commenting may mean that the code is over-complicated. A good rule is to comment everything that needs it but write code that doesn't need much of it. Comments that explain __why__ something is done and how the code relates to its environment are useful.

A particularly irksome form of over-commenting explains exactly what each statement does, even when it is obvious to any reasonably competant programmer, e.g.

/* Open the input file */ infd = open(input_file, O_RDONLY);
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

comments

Lines of documentation in program source code and batch file scripts. Comments, also called "remarks," are words or symbols that identify a line or a group of lines as text that is not to be compiled or executed.

Comment Quality
The bottom line is that most programmers hate to document, and the quality of the documentation ranges from the ridiculous to the sublime (rarely sublime). The quality of the comments goes a long way in determining the ease with which a program can be changed, not only by other programmers, but also by the original programmer. See obfuscator and comment out.


Sample Codes for Comments/Remarks
When several lines of comments are used, the start and stop symbols for multi-line comments eliminate having to enter a code on each line.
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References in periodicals archive ?
USTR said commenters should submit information related to trade barriers in categories including other countries' import policies, technical barriers to trade, sanitary/phytosanitary standards, subsidies, government procurement restrictions, intellectual property protection, services barriers, digital trade and e-commerce barriers, and competition policies.
Another commenter, yvoniemarie, requested for more song covers from Banawa and her daughter.
"So you faking the reviews for sells?" (http://www.buzzfeed.com/elliewoodward/kylie-jenner-shut-down-claims-fake-reviews-promote-skincare) one commenter A wrote.
Another commenter posted: "Congratulations @NorthnorfolkDC on actively, consciously making the world worse."
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Another commenter that obviously supported the post wrote, "The pig may be one of the greatest gifts God gave us."
The Commenters' suggestion that approval of individual, rule-compliant transactions like this one should be subject to an ad hoc review of a merged entity's supposed negotiating leverage is meritless and should be rejected."
Researchers have also found that the toxic, abusive nature of story comment sections leads to fewer comments and fewer commenters, meaning that your failure to censor comments that cross a line, or ban abusive trolls, is keeping other people away.
(32) A commenter alleges that GS Bank was behind peer institutions in its percentage of assets devoted to community development.
Synopsis: In 'Confessions from the Comments Section: The Secret Lives of Internet Commenters and Other Pop Culture Zombies,' humorist Jonathan Kieran shines an uproarious and irreverent light upon 33 different "types" of internet commenter, exploring issues like religious hypocrisy, narcissism, and celebrity obsession while probing the hilarious depths to which human behavior will plunge when people think they are anonymous online.