airline

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airline

1. 
a. a system or organization that provides scheduled flights for passengers or cargo
b. (as modifier): an airline pilot
2. a hose or tube carrying air under pressure
http://routesinternational.com/air.htm
http://airlines.afriqonline.com
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The report called on the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to "examine the safety benefits of introducing a standard for real-time tracking of commercial air transport aircraft".
ATW has been the leading monthly magazine serving the needs of the global airline and commercial air transport manufacturing communities for nearly 47 years.
2 What was the original name of Britain's long-range commercial air transport company founded in 1924?
That's important if personal air vehicles are ever going to bridge the gap between commercial air transport and the family car.
Commercial air transport has faced a number of tests over its ninety-year history: the creation of a regulatory framework within which the international industry can operate and the technological challenge of building civil aircraft that are both safe and economically efficient, are two that spring to mind.
"During 2006, the last year for which full data is available, there were 74 airprox incidents involving commercial air transport and 92% of these were assessed as having no risk of collision".
The newly-elected President of the ASD, Swedish CEO for Saab Ake Svensson, said that the European manufacturers had to take up the "leadership for environmentally friendly commercial air transport".
In the commercial air transport arena, Airbus was the dominant player overwhelming its rival Boeing with technology enhancements and related revenue growth for three years in a row.
"The commercial air transport industry relies very heavily on flying clubs for a supply of new pilots.
Propeller aircraft, however, dominated commercial air transport well into the 1950s, at least in the U.S.
The rapid acceptance of GPWS by the commercial air transport industry resulted in a precipitous drop in Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) accidents.
FAR 25 describes critical castings in terms of "failure." The commercial air transport view of failure is that ultimate strength was exceeded.

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