commodity machine

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commodity machine

An off-the-shelf device that is readily available for purchase. Commodity PCs and servers often refer to x86 machines, which are the world's largest desktop, laptop and server platform. See x86-based system, COTS and commodity product.
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Deploying a RAN on commodity hardware opens the door for merchant processor makers in the 5G market, but comes with the challenge to reduce costs significantly while supporting extremely demanding tasks.
The new version of Forsa sets the bar for enabling larger databases, I/O hungry HPC jobs, artificial intelligence and machine learning model training to run in memory on commodity hardware through support for larger systems with more CPUs and memory, and by supporting Persistent Memory technologies like Intel Optane DC persistent memory.
The net result of this shift away from commodity hardware to cloud applications was a Q4 non-GAAP operating margin of 47%, the highest we've seen in five years." "Our Fusion ERP and HCM cloud applications suite revenues grew 32% in FY19," said Oracle CEO, Mark Hurd.
On the one hand, there is nothing magical about the cloud: service providers use exactly the same commodity hardware that you can buy.
Quobyte allows companies to scale storage capacity and performance linearly on commodity hardware while eliminating the need to expand administrative staff through the software's ability to self-monitor, self-maintain, and self-heal.
Through its patented technology, Formulus Black enables larger database and analytics workloads to persist and run in memory on commodity hardware without any application modifications.
The emergence of new open technologies allows providers to deploy the same functionality on commodity hardware.
Clustar's self-developed AI platform, based on data center commodity hardware, provides users with a high-performance, distributed, and scalable artificial intelligence infrastructure.
It decouples and abstracts commodity hardware to deliver low- latency and parallel throughput for the substantial requirements of cloud services and apps, the elasticity and agility to scale to thousands of servers, and to grow to hundreds of petabytes with little to no added administrative burden.
Apple's interpretation of its unit figures, in my opinion, is spot-on: Apple is a premium ecosystem, not just a commodity hardware producer.

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