common carotid artery

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common carotid artery

[¦käm·ən kə′räd·əd ′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
Bacharach et al., "Angioplasty and primary stenting of the subclavian, innominate, and common carotid arteries in 83 patients," Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol.
Caption: Figure 2: Volume-rendered reconstructions from Magnetic Resonance Angiography examination showing diffuse narrowing of the left subclavian artery (a) and common carotid arteries bilaterally (b).
After the ramification of the tracheosyringeal trunk, the ascending oesophageal arteries arose from the common carotid arteries, from the ventral surface on the right and the dorso-lateral surface on the left.
Among the 10 patients who consumed pomegranate juice, the mean IMT of the left and right common carotid arteries decreased by 13%, 22%, 26%, and 35% at months 3, 6, 9, and 12, respectively.
During a single examination many vessels can be evaluated including the aortic arch; common carotid arteries; carotid bifurcations; cervical, petrous, cavernous carotid arteries; proximal, middle, and anterior cerebral arteries; vertebral arteries; and the basilar artery.
Major vessels include the common carotid arteries, internal carotid arteries, anterior cerebral, middle cerebral, posterior cerebral, vertebral and the basilar arteries.
Between 60 and 100 ml of very diluted and red-colored latexneoprene was injected immediately after rinsing with demineralized water in both common carotid arteries. The injection of latex was conducted progressively with hand pressure, using 60 ml syringes, until the coloration of the little arterioles in the conjunctiva was visible.
In addition, multifocal atherosclerotic plaques formation could be found in common carotid arteries, external carotid arteries, and subclavian arteries bilaterally.
All patients were subjected to CT scan brain and colour doppler study of extracranial carotid arteries, the systolic and diastolic velocity of blood flow, and the ratio of peak systolic velocities of common carotid arteries, carotid intimal medial thickness, presence of atheromatous plaque and thrombus were looked for and then the percentage of stenosis of the affected patients were assessed.
The cranial cervical ganglion is mainly supplied by 2 or 3 vessels originated from the ascending pharyngeal artery in human (Tubbs et al., 2002; Hacein-Bey et al., 2002), one branch from the ascending pharyngeal artery and 1 or 2 branches from occipital artery and cervical branch of the occipital artery in the dog (Chungcharoen et al., 1952; Marcarian and Jenkins, 1967), 1 or 2 branches from the occipital and one branch from common carotid arteries in cat and rabbit (Chungcharoen et al., 1952).
Carotid intima media thickness was measured in the left and right common carotid arteries. During examination, the subject lay supine with the neck extended and the chin turned contralateral to the side.