Common rafter

common rafter

[¦käm·ən ′raf·tər]
(building construction)
A rafter which extends from the plate of the roof to the ridge board at right angles to both members, and to which roofing is attached.

Common rafter

A sloped roof member that is smaller than the principal rafter, which spans from the top plate of the exterior wall to the roof ridge rafter.

common rafter

common rafter
In wood-frame construction, one of a number of slanting structural members (extending from the ridgeboard down to the eaves) that support the roof; these members are usually of the same size and evenly spaced along the length of the roof ridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cut a common rafter for a pattern and lay it on the drawing to check for fit.
Make the full-scale drawing to the dimensions and roof slope in your plan (Figure B) and use it to measure the exact height of the ridge (temporary post) and the lengths and angles on the common rafters.
Construct a simple jig for marking the common rafters.
Skylights are manufactured with common rafter spacing in mind to minimize the number of rafters that need to be cut.
The gable rafters (H) are the same as the common rafters except they sit atop the front and rear headers, so they need to be scribed (Photo 10) to fit.
The common rafters (Photo 6) are all the same length and have the same miter cut at the top and the same "bird's-mouth" or notch cut near the bottom.
This miter angle differs from that of the common rafters (Fig.
E) rest on the header just like the common rafters and have the same degree measurement at the top.
These 45-degree cuts on each side allow the common rafters to fit against the hips tightly.