Communication Trench


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Communication Trench

 

a narrow ditch with an embankment on each side, providing concealed passage between trenches as well as communication with the rear. Laid out in an irregular or winding path to protect personnel from enfilade fire, the trench may be up to 2 m deep and have a width of 70 cm or more at the bottom. Depending on the depth of the trench, troops may move through it either standing upright or crouching. Rifle pits, machine-gun emplacements, recesses, and other structures are built into the trench walls, with cul-de-sacs and wide areas dug out every 20–30 m to allow two-way traffic. Communication trenches on the forward slope of a hill have traverses.

References in periodicals archive ?
In a newspaper article Lt Crowther's commanding officer wrote: "He had the duty of setting out a communication trench leading to a German trench as soon as it was captured.
On August 8, 1916, he found himself near Arrow Head Copse where, during an advance, he was in command of two platoons ordered to dig a frontline communication trench.
In June, with light casualties for once, the 16th was fighting so effectively in an attack on Orpy Wood that divisional orders named the main German trench they had captured as 'Birmingham Street' and the nearby communication trench 'Brum Street'.
On July 3, 1915, the 26-year-old secondlieutenant in the Worcestershire Regiment led a group of bomb throwers, tasked with taking a Turkish communication trench in Gallipoli.

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