Communications of the ACM


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Communications of the ACM

(publication)
(CACM) A monthly publication by the Association for Computing Machinery sent to all members. CACM is an influential publication that keeps computer science professionals up to date on developments. Each issue includes articles, case studies, practitioner oriented pieces, regular columns, commentary, departments, the ACM Forum, and technical correspondence, and advertisements.

http://acm.org/cacm/.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-blocking algorithms and scalable multicore programming, Communications of the ACM, Volume 56, issue 7, 50-61, ACM, New York, U.S.A.
Shaw, "Curriculum '78--is computer science really that unmathematical?" Communications of the ACM, vol.
Stoica, "A view of cloud computing," Communications of the ACM, vol.
In the Communications of the ACM, Czaja and Hiltz (2005) highlighted the importance of considering the needs and abilities of older adults in system design.
"Agile Project Management: Steering from the Edges." Communications of the ACM, 48 (12): 85-89.
Based on our analysis, MIS Quarterly and Communications of the ACM were tied in publishing the most ISO articles based on sheer numbers.
Further reading: "Recent Progress in Quantum Algorithms" by Dave Bacom and Wim van Dam, Communications of the ACM.
"Live forensics: Diagnosing your system without killing it first," Communications of the ACM, Vol.
Toward Public-Key Infrastructure Interoperability Communications of the ACM, 46, 98-100, 2003.
The researchers reported in the April 2006 Communications of the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) that after running an analysis on 30 to 40 messages from any known author, the program could identify subsequent messages by that author with 93 percent accuracy in Chinese, 95 percent in Arabic, and 99 percent in English.
He originated the Lisp programming language, publishing its design in Communications of the ACM in 1960, and began the initial research on general-purpose time-sharing computer systems.

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