Company Unions

Company Unions

 

organizations created by employers to exert pressure on the working people and struggle against the trade unions; company unions usually include the production and office workers of one firm or company. They are most widespread in the USA and Canada. The Rockefellers created one of the first company unions in the USA in 1915. By 1929 their number had grown to 900, with a total membership of 1.4 million. The resolute opposition of workers, headed by progressive trade union leaders, to company unions has led to a notable restricting of their activity.

REFERENCE

Lens, S. Krizis amerikanskikh profsoiuzov. Moscow, 1961. (Translated from English.)
References in periodicals archive ?
What Hirsch finds is a complicated picture in which employee aspirations often fell victim to clever company policies of dividing labor by skill, race, and gender--and appealing to workers through welfare programs and company unions.
Defying national trends, the Pullman Company, which suffered severely from a drastic reduction in ridership during the Depression, fended off increasingly militant organizational drives by retaining welfare benefits and expanding company unions.
The documents, released hours before Wednesday night's debate between Clinton and Bob Dole, the Republican candidate, include an 11-page commitment from the authoritarian government of President Suharto to cease using the Indonesian military to break up industrial disputes and to allow workers to organize into independent company unions.
The most important of those changes was permission for workers to form company unions that could negotiate collective labor agreements, and a government agreement to issue regulations that ``eliminates the role of the security authorities in cases of industrial dispute.
The broadly written prohibition was effective, and employer-run unions became virtually extinct by the 1950s, Today, however, this section of the NLRA is being used to brand employer-employee cooperation meetings as illegal company unions.
This paper offers a reexamination and reinterpretation of the emergence of company unions in the United States during the early 20th century.
By the mid-1920s, many of the large manufacturing firms had established worker voice mechanisms in the form of company unions.
The editors open by relating the various chapters to current debates over the relative merits of company unions, independent unions, works councils, and employer-initiated involvement programs for providing a greater degree of employee representation in the United States.
Unlike current employer-initiated employee involvement programs, or the company unions of the pre-Wagner Act era, the EPCs would have independent existence (so they could not be dissolved unilaterally by the employer) and legal guarantees of key employee rights.
In some instances, workers rescinded their affiliation with their craft organization to join company unions.
More information on Tenet, along with reports on SEIU campaigns to set up company unions across the U.