Company Unions

Company Unions

 

organizations created by employers to exert pressure on the working people and struggle against the trade unions; company unions usually include the production and office workers of one firm or company. They are most widespread in the USA and Canada. The Rockefellers created one of the first company unions in the USA in 1915. By 1929 their number had grown to 900, with a total membership of 1.4 million. The resolute opposition of workers, headed by progressive trade union leaders, to company unions has led to a notable restricting of their activity.

REFERENCE

Lens, S. Krizis amerikanskikh profsoiuzov. Moscow, 1961. (Translated from English.)
References in periodicals archive ?
This is not the place to go to read the author's denunciations of what the American labour movement has traditionally referred to as "company unions." This is the place to go to understand how and to lesser extent why all company unions were not the same.
What Hirsch finds is a complicated picture in which employee aspirations often fell victim to clever company policies of dividing labor by skill, race, and gender--and appealing to workers through welfare programs and company unions. Meanwhile trade unions, often fighting each other more than battling Pullman, proved of limited benefit to workers.
The broadly written prohibition was effective, and employer-run unions became virtually extinct by the 1950s, Today, however, this section of the NLRA is being used to brand employer-employee cooperation meetings as illegal company unions.
This paper offers a reexamination and reinterpretation of the emergence of company unions in the United States during the early 20th century.
Some of Newt Gingrich's "revolutionaries" are also attempting to legalize company unions, abolish overtime pay, outlaw union shops, and repeal laws that guarantee prevailing wages for construction workers on federally funded projects.
The editors open by relating the various chapters to current debates over the relative merits of company unions, independent unions, works councils, and employer-initiated involvement programs for providing a greater degree of employee representation in the United States.
It was intended, back in the 1930s, to prohibit the formation of company unions. It has long since outlived any usefulness it once had.
The government "should also modify the ban on company unions:' since most nonunion workers are "not going to join the A.F.L.-C.I.O.
He urged Rockefeller to adopt a plan that would anticipate and minimally address miners' grievances: "Such provision would not only take the wind out of the union's sails, but would appeal, I am confident, tot he soundest public opinion." Bust the unions, in other words, but do it with a smile--using company unions to give workers just enough of a voice to minimize the risk of serious trouble.
Company unions, working-class unity, rank-and-file militancy, labour law, the New Deal, and ultimately the rise of steel unionism itself are revisited.
In some instances, workers rescinded their affiliation with their craft organization to join company unions. By the early fall, peace had returned to fifteen of the fifty-two railroads involved in the strike.
The law was intended to keep employers from forming slavish company unions as a means of keeping out real unions.