Company town

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Company town

Towns that were established at or near the raw materials for the manufacturing processes that the company owned, such as the coal mining towns in the south around the eighteenth century. Some provided homes, recreational halls, churches, hospitals, and stores for the workers.

company town

A community whose inhabitants depend predominantly on a single company for their employment and for many of their personal and family needs. The company may own and provide housing, schools, shopping facilities, recreational facilities, as well as church and library facilities for its workers and their families.
References in periodicals archive ?
From Redstone to Ludlow is divided into four sections: Osgood's background, labour relations policies, and business dealings (chapters 1-3), Colorado company towns and camps (chapter 5 and 6), colliers' strikes (chapters 4 and 7-14), and official investigations and reforms in the wake of the Ludlow Massacre (chapters 15 and 16).
After introductory material and a historical overview, the main part of the book is dedicated to case studies of particular company towns in Germany, Switzerland, Slovakia--and Maryland, USA and Canada, as well.
While his analysis suggests a neat dichotomy between the two company towns, one must question the sometimes single-minded focus on class conflict as the primary signifier of class.
Along the Middle Fork of the John Day River in Eastern Oregon is the state's newest park - a 131-acre site of a former lumber mill and company town that operated for 60 years and once was home to 400 families.
The Silicon Valley area, with its concentrated need for a unique mixture of labor, started as a kind of company town, growing to support the specific needs of HP, Intel, and other technology pioneers, but the region quickly evolved into a unique commercial ecosystem that included a local government able to provide the necessary services.
Once upon a time, social activists decried the plight of workers in company towns whose paychecks vanished each week because they were being gouged by the local stores.
The fundamental problem is private ownership of human communities--digital company towns where the owner has absolute power, and the entire history of due process and personal rights in human society does not apply.
Moreover, these industrial pursuits, which in the case of aluminum and mining relied almost exclusively on men, dramatically affected gender relations, as women sought out new ways to maintain subsistence patterns even while living in company towns.
In the early twentieth century numerous primary extractive industries constructed company towns on the resource frontiers of North America.
in 1928 and the opening of new company towns (largely unplanned and poorly serviced) rooted by their mines below.
These were the company towns, engines of American industrialization left in the dust of the great migration to the Sun Belt and the suburbs.