CMOS

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CMOS

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CMOS

(Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) Pronounced "c-moss." The most widely used integrated circuit fabrication for technology nodes down to 20 nm (see process technology). CMOS chips are found in almost every electronic product from handheld devices to mainframes. CMOS uses PMOS and NMOS transistors wired in a balanced fashion that causes less power to be used (for more details, see MOSFET). The first transistors were bipolar, which are still used when higher power is required. CMOS and bipolar are also used in combination. See FinFET, bipolar transistor and CMOS memory.


A Note From the Author
In the early 1980s, my wife Irma and I had a kitten at the beach I named CMOS. When we introduced her to people, everyone thought "Sea Moss" was such a cute name for a beach cat. However, when we told them CMOS stood for "complementary metal oxide semiconductor," they didn't come around much any more! CMOS didn't last long, as I became quite allergic to her a few months later.








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References in periodicals archive ?
Chips manufactured using CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) technology form the basis of many consumer electronic devices used in daily life such as personal computers, smart phones, high definition TV and game consoles.
The downscaling of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors is nearing the limit where there are simply too few electrons in a device's active region to prevent quantum fluctuation errors.
The system consists of three components: an infrared light unit that is trained on the driver's face; a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) imager that takes pictures of the eyes to determine the percentage of closure; and an electronics module housing a digital signal processor that plugs into the serial bus behind the dashboard.
Matsushita Electric Industrial rose 37 yen to 1,629 yen on reports that it has developed a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistor that can significantly reduce power consumption by system chips.
The MSM6050 is QUALCOMM's first wireless baseband chip produced using 300mm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication, provided by the company's partner Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd.
Their topics include integrated analog signal processing readout front ends for particle detectors, low-noise detectors through incremental sigma-delta analog-digital converters, digital pulse-processing techniques for X-ray, silicon photo-multipliers for high-performance scintillation crystal readout applications, and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor image sensors for radiation detection.
Lincoln's Lab FPA differs from a conventional GM APD in that each pixel is mated to a digital, silicon, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor timing circuit that measures the arrival time of the photons.
A research article in the journal Applied Physics Letters says that the new chip is similar in type to an existing technology known as complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) memory, a common commercial chips that provide the data storage for USB flash drives and other devices.
Until recently, developers had to rely on expensive CCD (charge-coupled device) imaging solutions to gain the clarity needed for eye-tracking, but research has now shifted entirely to the use of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) imagers.
The Kumamoto center will use its new production line to turn out mainly CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) image sensors, it said.
Like its 1994 predecessor, the 1997 Roadmap is a 15-year forecast of technology required to create complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits.
Their topics include Monte Carlo simulations of radiation effects, radiation effects in flash memories, single-event mitigation techniques for analog and mixed-signal circuits, radiation effects on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor active pixel sensors, and radiation effects on optical fibers and fiber-based sensors.

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