Complete street

Complete street

A multimodal street that is designed and operated to enable safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and bus riders of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along and across a complete street.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
This is in addition to providing complete street lighting in both directions, which will be completed by the end of September next year.
A complete street design addresses the needs of all users of the system, including bicyclists, pedestrians, transit riders, and motorists, in a way appropriate to the local community.
The third phase of the loop retrofitted a signature complete street along the entire length of H and Parker Streets and included two 10-foot wide lanes, 5.5-foot bike lanes and 4-foot sidewalks along both sides buffered by grassy median strips.
This "complete street" model is being widely adopted and promoted by cities throughout the country.
"If it's designed really well and made a complete street that includes the needs of cyclists, pedestrians and transit, great, but it's still road-building, and doesn't belong in transportation alternatives," Miller says.
Included in the release is the companya[euro](tm)s first release of MultiNet Chile, covering that countrya[euro](tm)s complete street network, together with the extended coverage in India and Brazil and off road content covering Angola, either, Lesotho, Namibia and South Africa.
This was not just another old building being flattened, it formed part of the only remaining complete street of Victorian office facades in the city.
Further legislation to ensure that utilities complete street works on time might also be brought in, he said.
Business offers reverse indexing, quarterly updates, and complete street address information without meters or additional fees.
She said each "complete street" will look different depending on where it is and what the street is used for, but they often include pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly amenities, including sidewalks, shared lane bicycle markings, paved shoulders, crosswalks, bike racks, landscaping and street furniture, such as benches.
The maps for the Philippines offer coverage of nearly 10,000 kilometres of navigable roads, including fully attributed street network coverage of Manila, while the Brunei maps cover more than 2,700 kilometres of roadways and offer complete street network coverage of the country.
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