compression stroke

compression stroke

[kəm′presh·ən ‚strōk]
(mechanical engineering)
The phase of a positive displacement engine or compressor in which the motion of the piston compresses the fluid trapped in the cylinder.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the vehicle is maintaining a constant speed and requires low engine output, CVVD opens the intake valve from the middle to end of the compression stroke. This helps to improve fuel efficiency by reducing the resistance caused by compression, said the statement from Hyundai.
Finally, momentum in the crankshaft drives the piston back up for a compression stroke, and new air and fuel fill the crankcase from the carburetor.
The upgraded fuel can withstand a greater rise in temperature during the compression stroke of an internal combustion engine without auto-igniting.
When in the compression stroke, the process is a little more complicated and the flow process can be divided into two parts:
Then there is a compression stroke that presses the resin through the preform so that it is entirely saturated.
In figure 1A, the piston is at the end of the suction stroke about to start compression and in figure IB, the compression stroke has just been completed.
During the compression stroke of a spark ignition engine the pressure, density, and temperature are increased.