Compton scattering

(redirected from Compton's effect)
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Compton scattering

(komp -tŏn) (Compton effect) An interaction between a photon of electromagnetic radiation and a charged particle, such as an electron, in which some of the photon's energy is given to the particle. The photon is therefore reradiated at a lower frequency (i.e. with a lower energy) and the particle's energy is increased. In inverse Compton emission the reverse process takes place: photons of low frequency are scattered by moving charged particles and reradiated at a higher frequency.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Compton scattering

[¦käm·tən ¦skad·ə·riŋ]
(quantum mechanics)
The elastic scattering of photons by electrons. Also known as Compton process; gamma-ray scattering.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gamma-ray photons with energies of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV lead to atom ionization by Compton's effect. Since the probability for atom ionization by photoelectric effect is significantly higher than that by Compton's effect, during X-ray irradiation a larger number of positive trap charge is formed during X-ray irradiation than during gamma-ray irradiation which directly effects the change in [DELTA][V.sub.T] values.