Compton scattering

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Compton scattering

(komp -tŏn) (Compton effect) An interaction between a photon of electromagnetic radiation and a charged particle, such as an electron, in which some of the photon's energy is given to the particle. The photon is therefore reradiated at a lower frequency (i.e. with a lower energy) and the particle's energy is increased. In inverse Compton emission the reverse process takes place: photons of low frequency are scattered by moving charged particles and reradiated at a higher frequency.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Compton scattering

[¦käm·tən ¦skad·ə·riŋ]
(quantum mechanics)
The elastic scattering of photons by electrons. Also known as Compton process; gamma-ray scattering.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As an example, with the parameters of the Compton scatter laser; [[sigma].sub.e] ~ [[lambda].sub.L] = 0.8 [mu]m, [I.sub.L] = [10.sup.18] W/[cm.sup.2] ([a.sub.o] = 0.68), [P.sub.L] = 1TW, [r.sub.L]/[[lambda].sub.L] = 10, [[TAU].sub.L] = 0.84 ps and [U.sub.L] = 0.84 J, the luminosity of the all-optical photon collider for the center-of-mass system energy of 1.4 MeV is estimated to be [L.sub.[gamma][gamma]] : 5.9 x [10.sup.27], 2.0 x [10.sup.28] and 3.7 x [10.sup.28] [cm.sup.-2] [s.sup.-1] for the case of head-on interaction [[alpha].sub.int] [approximately equal to] 0 and the photon relative energy spread [DELTA][E.sub.[gamma]]/[E.sub.[gamma]max] of 10, 20 and 30% (the corresponding Compton scattering cross section of [DELTA][[sigma].sub.Compton] = 90,164, 226mb), respectively.
Glover, "Compton scatter effects in CT reconstructions," Medical Physics, vol.
Topics include measuring coating thickness, selection of a leak testing method, inspecting aluminum and magnesium castings, digital imaging and communication, X-ray Compton scatter tomography, calibrating CT density, and ultrasonic surface examination.
The arms are illuminated due to the Compton scatter radiation produced during the L5-S1 spot exposure.