Compton scattering


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Compton scattering

(komp -tŏn) (Compton effect) An interaction between a photon of electromagnetic radiation and a charged particle, such as an electron, in which some of the photon's energy is given to the particle. The photon is therefore reradiated at a lower frequency (i.e. with a lower energy) and the particle's energy is increased. In inverse Compton emission the reverse process takes place: photons of low frequency are scattered by moving charged particles and reradiated at a higher frequency.

Compton scattering

[¦käm·tən ¦skad·ə·riŋ]
(quantum mechanics)
The elastic scattering of photons by electrons. Also known as Compton process; gamma-ray scattering.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1927, Klein (5) discussed how the interaction between an electron and an electromagnetic field including Compton scattering should be treated quantum mechanically.
Compton scattering is an interaction between photons and charged particles such as electrons [4,5].
Compton scattering is a quantum process that involves the inelastic scattering of a photon by an electron.
Called inverse Compton scattering, this process produces more gamma rays when the compact companion passes near the star on the far side of its orbit as seen from our perspective.
A high-quality Gamma-beam generated from inverse Compton scattering off relativistic electron beams interacting with an intense laser pulse arouses interest in photonuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, characterization of nuclear materials or radioactive waste and so on.
And at the highest frequencies, Lazzati would invoke an altogether different emission mechanism: inverse Compton scattering, where energetic electrons knock into a photon and bump it up to higher energies.
An advantage of (31) is that, when applied to Compton scattering, it is not necessary to make the assumption [[?
They theorized that the observed X-rays were actually generated from gamma rays by the process known as Compton scattering.
In the current work, the researchers used the unprecedented x-ray intensity produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source x-ray laser to observe the concerted nonlinear Compton scattering of two identical hard x-ray photons from the light element beryllium to produce a single higher-energy photon.
As a result, the additional single-notoph mode is detected by the lifetime spectrometer in the "stop" channel by Compton scattering of an electron e of energy [less than or equal to] 0.