Compton scattering


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Compton scattering

(komp -tŏn) (Compton effect) An interaction between a photon of electromagnetic radiation and a charged particle, such as an electron, in which some of the photon's energy is given to the particle. The photon is therefore reradiated at a lower frequency (i.e. with a lower energy) and the particle's energy is increased. In inverse Compton emission the reverse process takes place: photons of low frequency are scattered by moving charged particles and reradiated at a higher frequency.

Compton scattering

[¦käm·tən ¦skad·ə·riŋ]
(quantum mechanics)
The elastic scattering of photons by electrons. Also known as Compton process; gamma-ray scattering.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mann, "Compton scattering factors for spherically symmetric free atoms," The Journal of Chemical Physics, vol.
This process, which measures double diffractive deeply virtual Compton scattering for two spacelike photons, is illustrated in Figure 8.
In 1927, Klein (5) discussed how the interaction between an electron and an electromagnetic field including Compton scattering should be treated quantum mechanically.
Compton scattering is an interaction between photons and charged particles such as electrons [4,5].
For Compton scattering the Z dependence is linear and the dominant energy region varies within the range between 150 keV and 3 MeV.
where [mu] is X-ray linear attenuation coefficient, [rho] is the electron density, a is a fitting parameter, Z is the effective atomic number, E is X-ray photon energy, and [f.sub.KN](E) is the Klein-Nishina function which yields the electronic cross section of Compton scattering. Finally X-ray photons are transformed into visible light photons detected by back-end optoelectronic devices.
It was observed that the variation is negligible between 0.5 and 5MeV where Compton scattering dominates.
Individual chapters are devoted to the main branches of inelastic X-ray scattering: nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering with characteristic valence electron excitations, nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering with core- electron excitation, X-ray Raman scattering, the Compton scattering regime, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopy.
These devices use the gamma-electron spin dependent part of the Compton scattering cross section to filter out gammas of a particular polarization state.
Because of the minimal angle of the beam, background "white" radiation and Compton scattering are minimized, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis.