computer crime

(redirected from Computer abuse)
Also found in: Legal.

computer crime

(legal)
Breaking the criminal law by use of a computer.

See also computer ethics, software law.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chesal worked with Hukill last year on the Computer Abuse and Data Recovery Act, or CADRA, legislation to help small businesses and individuals who had their computer systems hacked or otherwise compromised.
Cases under CFAA's intentional damage provision map closely onto archetypal computer abuse of the sort that Congress and state legislatures emphasized when they enacted cybercrime statutes.
In reaction to the rampant hacking of business computers and data theft, Florida has passed a new law, the Computer Abuse and Data Recovery Act (CADRA), F.S.
[section] 1030 (2012)) (lowering amount of threshold damages needed to prove "loss"); Computer Abuse Amendments Act of 1994, Pub.
The group of experts meeting in the OECD adopted in a study conducted in 1996, the following working definition: "computer abuse is any illegal, unethical or unauthorized behavior concerning an automatic data treatment and/or data transmission." (3)
Organized alphabetically and based on interviews and his industry experience, the challenges relate to benchmarking, branding, budgets, change, committees, consultants, contracts, computer abuse, culture, customer service, delegation, difficult bosses, diversity, dress, forecasting, hiring and firing, humor, information technology, innovation, knowledge management, leadership, management, meetings, negotiation, offices, pricing, project management, recruiting, salaries, sex, strategy, teleworking, vision statements, work-life balance, and many others, with about 20 new topics in this edition, such as the capital asset pricing model and the art of flattery.
A number of scholars, victim advocates, and court personnel have requested for more specific research on telephone and computer abuse in the context of IPA.
The 33-year-old ex-trader, who now works for a technology consultancy, was found guilty of charges breach of trust, computer abuse and forgery.
Societe Generale denied these allegations and has since fired Kerviel and initiated an ongoing legal action against him for breach of trust, computer abuse and falsification.
A split of authority has developed, however, regarding the CFAA's applicability to employee computer abuse, and even among the jurisdictions applying the CFAA to employees, construction and application of the statute vary greatly.
Kerviel is currently under formal investigation for falsification, computer abuse and breach of trust, though fraud accusations have been disallowed.
Another company had its physical security investigative team working with its computer forensics team to reduce computer abuse, "which resulted in a 25 percent increase in available bandwidth."

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