utility computing

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utility computing

Pay-per-usage processing from a datacenter service provider. Customers access the computers in the datacenter via private lines or over the Internet and are charged for the amount of computing time they use in CPU seconds, minutes and hours. Also called "on-demand computing," utility computing was originally based on proprietary standards; however, it evolved into "cloud computing," which uses global standard Internet and Web protocols. If the service provider includes the application programs, it is called an "application service provider" (ASP) and falls under the umbrella of "software-as-a-service" (SaaS). See cloud computing, ASP and SaaS.
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USPRwire, Thu Nov 27 2014] Worldwide markets are poised to achieve significant growth as the cloud computing utility infrastructure and the smart phone communications systems for apps are put in place, continuing to drive the use of electronic document replacement of all paper documents.
With an innovative approach to application delivery, Wireless Standard is a Cloud Computing utility designed to address the needs of the world's largest enterprises in wireless retail but is scalable so small and mid-size companies can also benefit as well from an enterprise class solution.
The idea of computing utility dates back to the 1960s.
6) Partition a public computing utility such as Amazon EC2 into a quarantined virtual infrastructure ("Virtual Private Cloud");
com/) is understood to be the first computing utility grid available via the Internet.
Matrix Manager creates a visual grid by mapping applications against server and storage resources available in the computing utility.
Utility Computing Utility Computing is the The foundation of Utility concept of delivering Computing is automated storage on an as-needed provisioning and basis, grouping hardware virtualization.
Sun will build a network and computing utility for ACS, which will pay for the whole shebang under a utility pricing model.
Essentially, there appears to be a move under way to deliver IT on a 'buy-by-the-drink' service model that IDC refers to as computing utility.
A practical computing utility model for storage will require a unified framework for the management of all of the entities within a data center.
HP installed Frank Barker as general manager of the computing utility services division.

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