Comtat-Venaissin

Comtat-Venaissin

 

a former province in France, now part of the Vaucluse Department.

In the Middle Ages, the Duchy of Comtat-Venaissin was part of the Frankish state, later becoming part of the Kingdom of Aries. In the 12th century it passed to the counts of Toulouse. In 1271, Comtat-Venaissin was annexed by the French king, but in 1274, Philip III was compelled to cede it to Pope Gregory X. While under papal rule, Comtat-Venaissin was administered by a regent residing in Carpentras. The population was oppressed by heavy taxes. The attempts of French kings to annex Comtat-Venaissin in 1663, 1688, and 1768 were unsuccessful, and the area (along with Avignon) became part of France only in 1791, during the Great French Revolution, by a decree of the Legislative Assembly. The annexation was recognized by the papacy in 1797 by the Treaty of Tolentino and confirmed by the Peace of Lunéville in 1801.

References in periodicals archive ?
Prieres Journalieres a la Usage des Juifs du Comtat-Vanaissin consists of three prayers for morning, afternoon, and evening and Liturgie Comtadine is a setting of three Rosh Hashanah hymns that are wholly Provencal in nature using authentic Comtat-Venaissin Jewish melodies.
Urban kept peace at the curia, gave good government to Avignon and the Comtat-Venaissin, supported the re-conquest of the Papal States, promoted higher education, facilitated some monastic reform, and pursued a benefice policy that sought to eliminate accumulation, enforce residency, and enhance the provisees' educational qualifications.
Pansier, `Les debuts du theatre a Avignon a la fin du XVe siecle', Annales d'Avignon et du Comtat-Venaissin, vi (1919), pp.
Similarly, I will say Judeo-Provencal for the Jewish language of this area, despite the fact that many of its speakers lived in the area called the Comtat-Venaissin, which is adjacent to Provence but not part of it.
Avignon and the neighboring area, the Comtat-Venaissin, belonged to the Holy See and did not become part of France until two years after the French Revolution, in 1791.
Had the Jews of the Comtat-Venaissin not been isolated for centuries, they might have lost this unique feature long ago.
In addition to lassan hadodes, there seems to have been another name that the Jews of Avignon and the Comtat-Venaissin used for their language, a name that is variously spelled Shuadit, Chouadit, Chuadit, Chuadi, etc.