Conan Doyle


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Conan Doyle

Sir Arthur. 1859--1930, British author of detective stories and historical romances and the creator of Sherlock Holmes
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Now Fox has brought the story to light in the endlessly riveting Conan Doyle for the Defense: The True Story of a Sensational British Murder, a Quest for Justice, and the World's Most Famous Detective Writer.
Critique: An original, inherently fascinating read, and the first volume of a new 'Louise Conan Doyle Mysteries' series by John Allen, "Brimstone" is set in 1879 Victorian England in a kind of 'alternate universe' where the literary creator of Sherlock Holmes is actually a woman named Louise Conan Doyle.
But what fans might not know is that Conan Doyle was also a keen architect, helping design his own home in Surrey, a huge hotel in Canada and helping create Lyndhurst Park Hotel in the New Forest.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle definitely revamped the fate of the Strand and the sixty stories written by him are tiny compared to our insatiable thirst for his widely engrossing and entertaining books.
Conan Doyle was a seven-year-old schoolboy at Newington Academy in Edinburgh when he met his first murderer - French teacher Eugene-Marie Chantrelle.
The concept is of a young Arthur Conan Doyle super-sleuthing long before he grows into the famous creator of Sherlock Holmes.
But when Conan Doyle died in 1930, he wasn't buried in the local churchyard.
In "Arthur and Sherlock: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes", author and Sherlock Holmes fan Michael Sims traces the circuitous development of Conan Doyle as the father of the modern mystery, from his early days in Edinburgh surrounded by poverty and violence, through his escape to University (where he gained terrifying firsthand knowledge of poisons), leading to his own medical practice in 1882.
This article, therefore, examines the ambiguous and often contradictory binary between the ideal of scientific objectivity and Conan Doyle's recognition of subjective human nature.
Conan Doyle published his first story The Mystery of Sasassa Valley and his first non-fiction work Gelseminum As A Poison during his time in Birmingham.
The small town was a favourite spot for British tourists in the late 19th century, including Conan Doyle. The nearby Reichenbach Falls inspired him to use it as the setting for the final dramatic confrontation between Holmes and Moriarity.
an early cover for Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles