conclave

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conclave

RC Church
a. the closed apartments where the college of cardinals elects a new pope
b. a meeting of the college of cardinals for this purpose

Conclave

 

an assembly of cardinals convened after the death of the pope in Rome for the election of a new pope.

The assembly meets in quarters isolated from the outside world (the doors are sealed shut). The election is carried out by secret ballot. To be elected, a candidate must receive at least one more than two-thirds of the vote. The quarters are opened only after the election of a new pope. This arrangement was approved at the Second Council of Lyon in 1274.

References in periodicals archive ?
Tradition dictated that the cardinals opened the conclave with a morning Mass yesterday.
Summary: Vatican City: Cardinals prepared for a second day of conclave behind the Vatican's walls to .
In between the two conclaves (separated by just one month), some intrigue occurred that helped della Rovere's chances.
Summary: PUNE: Nearly 1,000 volunteers of the militant organization Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) are to participate in a weeklong conclave beginning on Dec.
When the smiling Albino Luciani became Pope John Paul I on August 26, 1978, after one of the shortest modern Conclaves, our then Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster Basil Hume, told us that the new Pope was God's choice.
It was one of the first formal acts before the Conclave starts tomorrow.
Conclave veterans say most of the heavy lifting involved in electing a pope happens out of public view.
Analysing the conclaves that took place during the last century, he makes a projection into the future that is thrilling to read.
It was, in fact, an anticipation of what will almost surely be the next great Vatican event: the conclave, when cardinals from all over the world gather in the Sistine Chapel to elect a successor to John Paul II.
Nearly every pope this century has revised the rules for papal conclaves, which occur immediately following the death - or in rare cases, resignation - of a pontiff.
In this century, conclaves have occurred on the average every 12 years or so: 1903, 1914, 1922, 1939, 1958, 1963 and 1978.