Concubinage

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Concubinage

 

in Roman law, the cohabitation of a man and woman with intent to enter into matrimony, distinguished from formal marriage and regulated by law.

As a legal institution, concubinage arose under a law enacted in 18 B.C. establishing severe punishment for adultery. The law absolved from punishment only those men cohabiting with women whom they intended to marry but could not because of legal prohibitions. For example, marriages between men of senatorial rank and freedwomen were forbidden by law. Children born in concubinage had limited rights of inheritance and could be legitimized, unlike other children born out of wedlock, who were completely deprived of property rights.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Au-dela de la valeur symbolique de ce debut de reconnaissance timide des couples homosexuels, la loi n'offre aux concubins pratiquement aucun droit nouveau.
Dans le cas du concubinage (qu'il soit homosexuel ou heterosexuel), la loi se limite a constater une situation de fait et en tire quelques consequences juridiques limitees, relatives essentiellement aux droits sociaux et au benefice du transfert du bail en cas de decks ou d'abandon de l'un des concubins. Les devoirs et les obligations des concubins entre eux sont quasi inexistants, et n'incluent aucune exigence alimentaire.
Or, malgre la constatation de la qualite de concubins pour les membres d'un couple homosexuel, le legislateur neerlandais, pour ne prendre que cet exemple, a estime necessaire de creer un cadre juridique de reconnaissance formelle des unions en question.
Recent research has revealed that 'this Shoris wife', whom the Elizabethans rechristen Jane, was in fact called Elizabeth Lambert.(15) As both a mercer's daughter and 'a Kings concubin', Jane/Elizabeth is a socially marginal figure on whom later writers are at liberty to project their own agendas.
Daniel's Rosamond observes that 'Shores wife is grac'd, and passes for a Saint';(18) Drayton's Matilda comments: 'The wife of SHORE winnes generall applause, | Finding a pen laborious in her prayse',(19) while the chaste Avisa dismisses both Mistress Shore and Rosamond as analogous royal concubines: 'Shores wife, a Princes secret frend, | Faire Rosomond, a Kings delight: | Yet both haue found a gastly end.