Concubinage


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Concubinage

 

in Roman law, the cohabitation of a man and woman with intent to enter into matrimony, distinguished from formal marriage and regulated by law.

As a legal institution, concubinage arose under a law enacted in 18 B.C. establishing severe punishment for adultery. The law absolved from punishment only those men cohabiting with women whom they intended to marry but could not because of legal prohibitions. For example, marriages between men of senatorial rank and freedwomen were forbidden by law. Children born in concubinage had limited rights of inheritance and could be legitimized, unlike other children born out of wedlock, who were completely deprived of property rights.

References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, this trajectory of critique of polygamy, concubinage, and divorce receives its fullest expression in the New Testament with the teaching of Jesus Christ and his apostles (TCF, 41-47), which refers us back to the original institution of marriage.
The Supreme Court of South Dakota found that a Mexican concubinage was not the legal equivalent of a common law marriage because it does not confer the same obligations and rights as a common law marriage.
Le concubinage a ete peu utilise dans le theatre a cause de la moralite de l'epoque.
The examples included in the text are revelatory--the Austrian legislation (1812, 1868), especially the Civil Code, made the relationship between the founders of a family less regulated by moral and religious norms--"<Undermining> the divine authority as regards marriage and family surely had a negative impact (unquantifiable, unfortunately), during the long and medium term, upon the rise of illegitimacy, concubinage, birth control, abortion and divorce.
226) According to the National Unity and Reconciliation Commission, polygamy often occurs in the form of concubinage and "presents a non-negligible gravity.
Once feminist demands stripped gender inequalities out of the civil code in the 1970s, and laws permitting contraception and abortion gave women control over their maternity, divorces and concubinage soared.
Margaret Miles examines what we can name about Augustine's nameless partner from our knowledge of the sexual arrangements of concubinage in late antiquity.
In chapter four, Garraway looks at the effects of the libertine colony, that is the system of desire, violence, and exclusion that characterized slave societies in the French Caribbean in an effort to establish a connection between the juridically enforced racial segregation that resulted in a rigid three-tiered caste society comprised of whites, free people of color, and slaves, and the persistence of interracial libertinage and concubinage as a social norm in the colonies, particularly among elite white men.
This book provides a unique perspective on attitudes to marriage, concubinage and social mobility amongst the Venetian Patriciate in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
What happens is that in many West African societies, no one enquires too closely into the exact relationships between people, and slavery can very easily be camouflaged by being transmuted into all manner of otherwise lawful relationships, such as marriage, concubinage or adoption.
There is feminist thinking on all kinds of issues--Li Ju-Chen's satirical critique of foot-binding and concubinage, on Henrik Ibsen's The Doll House, writings by John Stuart Mill, Friedrich Engels, W.