contrail

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contrail

[′kän‚trāl]
(meteorology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, it should come as no surprise that Longbottom was keenly interested in condensation trails.
Thus, on Christmas day 1939, over two years before the publication of Flight to Arras, Longbottom issued a SECRET report titled "Condensation Trails at High Altitudes" which begins by explaining the major implication of contrails for air warfare: a contrail aids enemy defenders by betraying the position of an aircraft that might otherwise be invisible.
A measure of the continuing importance of condensation trails is the series of contrail studies sponsored by the ARC.
In extremely cold Arctic climates, aircraft are known to produce condensation trails at ground level when they take off or land.
Furthermore, his report offers convincing evidence that Nead saw condensation trails over the Argonne region and not smoke trails.
Nead was not the first to recognize the relationship between the halo phenomenon and the nature of condensation trails. That honor goes to Alfred Wegener.
Contrail is a contraction of condensation trail, an early term applied to the thin, white clouds that appear behind aircraft when moisture in engine exhausts forms ice crystals in cold air that is already sufficiently saturated.
These pencil-thin condensation trails are short-lived, evaporating into invisibility as exhaust gases cool quickly to the surrounding air temperature.
The term chemtrail is derived from "chemical trail" just as contrail is an abbreviation for the condensation trail left by commercial aircraft.
Detractors -- including the British bases, which have been accused of being the culprits - however say the trails are nothing more than condensation trails or contrails which form when exhaust gases from passing passenger jet engines combine with very cold, humid air at high altitude."
The term chemtrail is derived from "chemical trail" in the same way as contrail is an abbreviation for the condensation trail left by commercial aircraft.
With 10,000 large commercial aircraft flying today and the number expected to double by the year 2020, contrails (short for "condensation trails") pose a growing environmental threat.