contrail

(redirected from Condensation trails)
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contrail

[′kän‚trāl]
(meteorology)
References in periodicals archive ?
For whatever reason, in September 1942, NACA's Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory issued a report on condensation trails.
Described as a "brief, nontechnical discussion of condensation trails .
Additionally, a section of the report discussed the possibility of suppressing condensation trails.
At times, planes near the end of the bomber stream had to complete their bomb runs by flying through condensation trails "so dense that it was no different than flying in clouds.
In extremely cold Arctic climates, aircraft are known to produce condensation trails at ground level when they take off or land.
Furthermore, his report offers convincing evidence that Nead saw condensation trails over the Argonne region and not smoke trails.
Nead was not the first to recognize the relationship between the halo phenomenon and the nature of condensation trails.
Contrail is a contraction of condensation trail, an early term applied to the thin, white clouds that appear behind aircraft when moisture in engine exhausts forms ice crystals in cold air that is already sufficiently saturated.
These pencil-thin condensation trails are short-lived, evaporating into invisibility as exhaust gases cool quickly to the surrounding air temperature.
As National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) meteorologist Thomas Schlatter explains, the formation of condensation trails requires temperatures lower than about minus 76 F and humidity of 70 percent or more.
The term chemtrail is derived from "chemical trail" just as contrail is an abbreviation for the condensation trail left by commercial aircraft.
The term chemtrail is derived from "chemical trail" in the same way as contrail is an abbreviation for the condensation trail left by commercial aircraft.