Conidae

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Related to Cone snail: stonefish

Conidae

[′kän·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A family of marine gastropod mollusks in the order Neogastropoda containing the poisonous cone shells.

Conidae

 

a family of marine gastropods. The shell is from 2 to 16 cm, conical in shape, and brightly multicolored. There are approximately 700 species. They inhabit tropical and subtropical seas. Conidae are predators who attack invertebrates. The radula is equipped with poison fangs, inside which there is a canal for the secretions of special poison glands. The similarity of the poison fangs of Conidae and those of snakes is an example of convergent development (convergence). The bite of Conidae is very painful, and in humans it causes elevated temperature and inflammation of the affected site. The shells of Conidae are used as decorations.

References in periodicals archive ?
From DNA enzymesto cone snail venom: The work of Baldomero M.
Toxins from cone snails such as [omega]-conotoxin MVIIA or Ziconotide, initially purified as SNX-111, is a potent reversible blocker of N type calcium channels (OLIVERA et al.
3D, asterisk) was likely the precursor of the tissue ridge that partially divides the short and long arms of the sac in post-metamorphic cone snails (Marsh, 1977).
Researchers from 13 European countries, including a team from Strathclyde University, are among those taking part in the Cone Snail Genome Project for Health.
A deadly poison, emitted by the cone snail, is holding out hope for suffers of chronic pain, epilepsy and neurological disorders.
To date, only about 100 of the estimated 50,000 cone snail toxins have been characterized, and only a handful tested for pharmacologic activity," says Bernstein.
Researchers at the company are studying the development of novel, highly efficacious drugs with minimal side effects based on the Cone Snail species.
William Brose and was derived from the venom of a killer sea snail, the cone snail.
The final section, on peptide toxins, contains a review of the work on conotoxins, the biologically active peptides in cone snail venom; sea anemone polypeptide toxins that affect sodium channels; and chapters on sea snake venom (neurotoxins), the cytolytic peptides found in sea anemones, some natural jellyfish toxins, plus an article on pardaxin, the neurotoxic polypeptide from the Red Sea Moses sole, Pardachirus marmoratus, which targets gills and pharynx of aquatic animals and is eyed as a shark repellant.
Peptides like those in cone snail venom block excitatory ion channels in the neurons that transmit pain signals to the brain without affecting the brain itself, and thus do not produce tolerance or addiction or affect mental acuity.
6-million-yearold cone snail shells from the Dominican Republic.