Confessions of an English Opium-Eater


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Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

Thomas de Quincy tells of his opium addiction, his nightmarish experiences, and the sufferings of withdrawal. [Br. Lit.: Haydn & Fuller, 155]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
(1778-1830), a romantically dogmatic but sympathetically appreciative critic; Thomas de Quincey (1785-1859), a capricious and voluminous author, master of a poetic prose style, best known for his 'Confessions of an English Opium-Eater'; Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), the best nineteenth century English representative, both in prose and in lyric verse, of the pure classical spirit, though his own temperament was violently romantic; Thomas Love Peacock (1785-1866), author of some delightful satirical and humorous novels, of which 'Maid Marian' anticipated 'Ivanhoe'; and Miss Mary Russell Mitford (1787-1855), among whose charming prose sketches of country life 'Our Village' is best and best-known.
This is the message of Confessions of an English Opium-eater by Thomas de Quincey.
in his 1821 "Confessions of an English Opium-Eater," his
Confessions of an English Opium-Eater: Being an Extract from the Life of a Scholar.
Confessions of an English Opium-Eater is the unabridged audiobook rendition of an autobiographical work by Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), who was prescribed the drug opium for pain relief from a chronic condition, and became an addict fascinated by his hallucinatory experiences while intoxicated.
After Thomas De Quincey's autobiographical Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821), which portrays the author as a victim of opium and its Oriental, in particular Chinese, associations, many a popular opium narrative followed suit, identifying China as the source of evil.
From his 1821 Confessions of an English Opium-Eater to his later political essays on the "China Question" dating from the 1840s and 1850s to his revised and expanded Confessions of 1856, the orientalist rhetoric of Thomas De Quincey reveals a persistent vacillation between virulent John Bullism and an anxious, indeed fearful, entrancement with the Orient and its powers of possession and imaginative expansion.
Unlike James Hogg, who created buzz for The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by publishing a letter in Blackwood's describing the excavation of a grave visited by the novel's "Editor," or Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, which clearly purports to be based on Thomas DeQuincey's own life, these works enjoy no relationships to any real-life events whatsoever.
In biographical essays from the 1830s and '40s, and in the enlarged 1856 Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, De Quincey manufactures the "record" of Coleridge's destructive opium habituation through suggestive allusion to literary figures who themselves struggle with of represent cultural anxieties about habituation.
Who wrote Confessions of an English Opium-Eater? 6.
Who wrote Confessions of an English Opium-Eater? flowers in which it can be found?
De Quincey, by contrast, decidedly did, although it was not until the publication of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) at what was for a writer of his generation the advanced age of 36 that his name gained currency with the expanding reading public that kept afloat a burgeoning array of periodicals in pre-Victorian England.