conflict theory

(redirected from Conflict approach)

conflict theory

  1. any theory or collection of theories which emphasizes the role of CONFLICT (especially between groups and classes) in human societies.
  2. more specifically, the relatively diffuse collection of theories that, in the 1960s, were ranged against, and contested the dominance of, Parsonian STRUCTURAL-FUNCTIONALISM and its emphasis on societies as mainly governed by value consensus and the internalization of institutionalized shared values. The main feature of such conflict theories was that:
  1. they accused functionalist sociologies of disregarding conflicts of value and interest in human societies, or at best regarding these as a secondary phenomenon;
  2. as an alternative to functionalism, they offered an account of both the integration of society and of social change which emphasized the role of POWER and COERCION and the pursuit of economic and political interests in human affairs, as well as the more general role of conflict.
While some versions of conflict theory were Marxist or influenced by Marxism (e.g. GOULDNER), others were not, and were advanced on a more eclectic basis. One important approach, for example, was based on the work of SIMMEL (e.g. Lewis Coser, 1956) and emphasized the social functions as well as the disruptive effects of conflict. Still others (e.g. DAHRENDORF, REX) emphasized the significance of WEBER as well as of Marx in the study of conflict. In a highly influential article (‘Social integration and system integration’, 1964), David LOCKWOOD underlined the importance of an approach in which conflict was more central than in functionalism, when he drew attention once again to the existence of ‘social conflicts’ and ‘system contradictions’, as well as ‘social integration’ and ‘system integration’, as major elements in social life (see also SOCIAL INTEGRATION AND SYSTEM INTEGRATION). In the 1970s and subsequently with the reflourishing of a full range of conflict theories, simple distinctions between ‘functionalism’ and ‘conflict theory’ are no longer important, and with this the usage of ‘conflict theory’ in sense 2 has faded.
References in periodicals archive ?
While a conflict approach may deliver short-term results, the long-term impacts can be devastating to the culture.
Thus, the first part describe the long processes which are allocated to the FWW and change the conflict approach and their studies, somehow making the transition from traditional to modern.
Speaking to The Times of London, the British-born photographer's stepmother Penny Bearman said: "We are sure that Luke would have given support to the ongoing discussions (to secure his release) in Yemen rather than the conflict approach. There had been threats before that had not been carried out."
The Pakistani military is also undergoing a successful image building exercise and appears to have tuned to the going trend, appreciating the paradigm shift in South Asia from the conflict approach to economic cooperation and mutual collaboration.
Befitting this social conflict approach's Marxist roots, Jones focuses on state-capital relations in the different member states of ASEAN and the role of the state and state institutions in supporting powerful owners and managers of capital in their domestic conflicts and transnational expansion.
The settlement commission is mandated to resolve tax disputes by serving as a neutral mediator, by adopting consensus rather than conflict approach.
Major features of SALS include (1) designs and functions for enhancing the effectiveness of DLMRs, (2) a learning model based on cognitive conflict approach for correcting statistical misconceptions, and (3) ten learning activities based on the learning model and earlier studies about statistical misconceptions.
Constructive conflict approach put its focus on conflict process and factors affecting the process to achieve goal, mainly successful administration of management information systems.
Pridemore, "Review of When Push Comes to Shove: A Routine Conflict Approach to Violence," Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Behavior 7 (2000): 125-128.
If one follows a motion cue conflict approach (Griffin, 1990; Reason, 1978; Reason & Brand, 1975), one may attribute motion sickness to a mismatch between visual cues indicating that the observer is stationary and inertial cues indicating that the observer is moving (e.g., when a person views an apparently stationary visual scene in a cabin below the deck of a boat moving on a stormy sea).
The Intuitive Rules Theory is one such theoretical framework, and the cognitive conflict approach is one such teaching approach.
First, the structural-functional approach which attempts to create stability and avoid change, second the conflict approach which sees change as a result of crisis and maintains order with power and force, and third the open-systems approach that views change from a different perspective, and sees change as a normal part of the system, inevitable and ever present.