CIP

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Related to Congenital insensitivity to pain: Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis

CIP

(1) (Common Isochronous Packet) The packet format used in time-based (real-time) FireWire transmission. See FireWire, IEC 61883 and mLAN.

(2) (Common Industrial Protocol) A high-level protocol used for control networks that provides an object model for services at layer 7 of the OSI model. DeviceNet, Ethernet/IP, ControlNet, CIP Sync and CIP Safety are examples of control networks that use CIP.

cast-iron pipe, cast-iron soil pipe

A pipe fabricated of an iron alloy containing carbon and silicon; usually lined with cement or coal-tar enamel and coated externally with one of a variety of materials to reduce corrosion by soils; known technically as gray cast-iron pipe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Absent innervation of skin and sweat glands in congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.
Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (cipa): The spectrum of radiological findings.
The syndrome of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhydrosis (CIPA) can be diagnosed clinically and confirmed by genetic testing.
Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (type IV) is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder.
In patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis syndrome, mutations in the TRKA (NTRK1) gene which codes the TRKA receptor have been defined.
Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis associated with congenital myasthenic syndrome.
The brother and sister have an extremely rare condition called Congenital Insensitivity to Pain, which stops their nerves recognising physical distress.
Five types of HSAN have been identified, and this classification is based on the hereditary pattern, the clinical features and the most affected neuronal systems: HSAN I, hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy; HSAN II, impairment of the discrimination of tactile and pressure stimuli; HSAN III, familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day Syndrome); HSAN IV congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis, and HSAN V (3).
Types of disease Main features of disease Type I Sensory radicular neuropathy Type II Congenital sensory neuropathy Type III Familial dysautonomia Type IV Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis Type V Congenital indifference to pain
Congenital insensitivity to pain is dangerous and ultimately terminal because the affected child is unable to tell when they are hurting themselves.
Congenital insensitivity to pain (as in the case of Bobby) can occur in various ways.

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