CONIC

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conic

[′kän·ik]
(mathematics)
A curve which may be represented as the intersection of a cone with a plane; the four types of conics are circle, ellipse, parabola, and hyperbola. Also known as conic section.

CONIC

["Dynamic Configuration for Distributed Systems", J. Kramer et al, IEEE Trans Soft Eng SE-11(4):424-436 (Apr 1985)].
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of projection planes based on cylinders, cones and planes has led to projections being described and classified variously as Conic, Cylindrical, Azimuthal and in various categories in between.
The subreflector is generated by a combination of local conic sections [S.sub.n] (n = 1, 2, 3, ..., N), sequentially concatenated to each other.
Hence the inductive assumption gives that either there is a line L [subset] M with deg(L [intersection] Z) [greater than or equal to] t + 2 or there is a conic D [subset] M with deg(D [intersection] Z) [greater than or equal to] 2t + 2.
Considerations regarding the evolution of joint by shrinking of the conic surfaces, The fifth National Symposium of Mechanic Machineries and Transmissions, MTM'88, pg.361, Cuj Napoca
Now as you move the point B, the movement of the circle is sampled along a conic locus.
HTML file created using Geogebra, illustrating the locus of the midpoint of a segment whose endpoints lie on a conic conic.html
since what students had visually recognized as a particular conic did
The first is designed for use with Cabri Geometry to study the parabola as a conic section.
Keywords: -- pencils of conics, (q+1)-arcs, Galois fields, psychopathology of time
It is for this reason that I decided to write about the Arabic translation of the Conics of Apollonius, and its impact on the research, as well as on the mathematics of Descartes and Fermat.
One may also use this article as a different technique for reduction of conic sections to the standard forms.
Originally published in 2007, in Russian, by the Moscow Center for Continuous Mathematical Education, this book begins with coverage of the elementary properties of conics--material that can be approached with standard high school curriculum as background; the second chapter covers some auxiliary material not usually covered in high school but necessary for understanding the following, more complicated chapters on projective properties, and metric properties of conics. Some 50 exercises and problems (with solutions) offer support, along with approximately 100 carefully prepared figures.