connective

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connective

An operator used in logic to combine two logical formulas. See first order logic.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Penn Discourse TreeBank (PDTB) and METU Turkish Corpus projects, discourse connectives are categorized based on both their syntactic and functional characteristics.
Temporal connectives construct a time and order relationship by showing the events in a text happen before, after or simultaneously with each other (Coskun 2005:83).
Dorsal portion of dorsal connective bifurcated to 2 slender branches (New Guinea) 2
Dorsal portion of dorsal connective not bifurcated to 2 slender branches, branches stout if present (Australia) 5
Because of its magnitude, The Connectives is also very hard to review--should I dedicate one word to each page?
There are four substantial chapters of general logical theory before getting to the connectives. In chapter 1 we examine the core concepts of truth, consequence, rules and proof.
This kind of rigid teaching contributes to an overuse and misuse of connectives that can be exemplified briefly by the following paragraph from a student's essay:
Writers of such prose have a shaky sense of the specific meaning of the connectives and a misplaced confidence in the ability of these linking words to organize their writing for them.
In addition to these general studies, research on the evolution of specific types of connectives and individual connectors in the English language has also gained in momentum, the present volume being a good illustration of this.
Yet, given that they have not focused on the cognitive processes involved in comprehending the relations among the spoken statements, they have not provided information about the role of causal connections and connectives in the comprehension of spontaneous spoken discourse.
The very nature of the distinction, of course, leads immediately to the issue Aristotle raises in (B), touched on in chapter 8 but never resolved by him, and that is the question of what counts as a "one thing." Every statement, however long, complex, compound, or with whatever number of connectives has some sort of unity, and Bacon acknowledges this even of statements that express more than one thing.
The standard account of logical constants is hybrid: on the one hand it contains a highly informative, precise, and systematic criterion for logical connectives, namely, the Boolean or truth-functional criterion; on the other hand it contains an altogether uninformative and unsystematic definition of logical constants other than connectives, namely, a definition by enumeration--C is a logical constant (other than connective) iff: C is `[for all]' or C is `[there exists]' or C is `=' (or C is definable from constants on this list and/or logical connectives).

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